Mickey Straub
Mayor
Karen J. Thomas
Village Clerk
Steven S. Stricker
Village Administrator
 

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Village of Burr Ridge Comprehensive Plan

  • Summary
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Community Vision
  • 3. Overview
  • 4. Land Use Plan
  • 5. Subarea Plans
  • 6. Community Design
  • 7. Transportation & Circulation
  • 8. Facilities & Services
  • 9. Implementation
  • Amendment- German Church Rd. Sub-Area Plan
  • Amendment- 2005 Corporate Park/Downtown Burr Ridge Sub-Area Plan
  • Appendix
  • Figures

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The 1999 Village of Burr Ridge Comprehensive Plan presents land use and development policies for the incorporated portions of Burr Ridge and areas that may be annexed to the Village of Burr Ridge in the future. The land use plan reflects the Village of Burr Ridge’s vision for its future development and largely continues existing development patterns. The Comprehensive Plan addresses residential, commercial and industrial development, open space policy, community design, community facilities, new growth areas and transportation issues. It also provides guidelines for enhancing and maintaining the overall physical and environmental character of the Village.  

Since the incorporation of the Village of Harvester in 1956, and the formation of the Village of Burr Ridge in 1962, Burr Ridge has sought to guide its own destiny as an upscale community with a strong rural character. Burr Ridge has grown as a bedroom community with a character that is distinctly different from its neighbors. Implementation of the Comprehensive Plan is intended to protect the Village’s residential character and ensure the continuance of a strong tax base which will enable the Village to maintain and improve existing levels of service and public facilities for its residents. In doing so, Burr Ridge will be able to achieve its community vision. 

COMMUNITY VISION

A plan should begin with a clear vision of what it hopes to accomplish. In the case of the Burr Ridge Comprehensive Plan, that future is described in the following statement. 

Burr Ridge is a high quality suburban community with low density neighborhoods characterized by distinctive homes in natural wooded settings. Our Village accommodates residents who seek a sense of privacy in a tranquil environment. We desire to enhance the Village’s physical beauty, keeping Burr Ridge a very special place. 

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PLAN RECOMMENDATIONS

The Comprehensive Plan identifies goals and objectives intended to help achieve this vision. These are supported by the following specific plan recommendations. 

Residential Development

Future residential developments should maintain, preserve and create additional wooded areas and other natural features, giving special consideration to topographical and floodplain conditions. The existing general pattern of housing types and low densities should be maintained, consistent with the underlying zoning. Future residential developments should be encouraged to have lot sizes of 30,000 square feet or larger. 

Commercial and Industrial Development

The existing industrial parks and commercial developments should be maintained and enhanced to appropriate standards to sustain a strong tax base for the Village. The development of vacant parcels within the Burr Ridge Corporate Park should be facilitated. However, commercial uses that have minimal traffic impact on surrounding residential areas should be emphasized. County Line Square should be renovated and developed with a wide range of neighborhood and convenience shopping or community uses, consistent with the needs of Burr Ridge residents. 

Open Space

Conservation easements should be encouraged as a method of preserving existing open spaces and wooded areas within Burr Ridge. A conservation easement is a legal agreement a property owner makes to restrict the type and amount of development that may take place on his or her property. Conservation easements should be actively encouraged along the County Line Road corridor and in the German Church Road subarea. The Village of Burr Ridge may serve as a qualified organization for receiving easement donations and, in appropriate circumstances, should consider doing so. 

New Growth Areas

The Village should actively seek appropriate boundary agreements with neighboring communities and annex the unincorporated parcels within its existing boundaries. These new growth areas should be integrated with the existing fabric of the Village. Plans should be developed to maintain and improve older county subdivisions that have been or will be annexed into Burr Ridge. 

The Burr Ridge Corporate Park Subarea

The Burr Ridge Corporate Park occupies one of the most prominent locations in Burr Ridge. Located adjacent to the Interstate Route I-55 and County Line Road interchange, the Corporate Park presents many visitors with their first image of Burr Ridge. Office is the preferred use for most of the remaining vacant land. This use represents a departure from the underlying L-1 Light Industrial zoning that is currently in place for a major portion of the Corporate Park. While office uses are allowed under the present zoning, industrial uses area also permitted which are not consistent with the development pattern that has been encouraged in the Corporate Park since its annexation into the Village of Burr Ridge. Consequently, the Village should rezone land to appropriate office classifications to reflect existing uses and accommodate desirable future developments. 

The Comprehensive Plan also recommends upgrading and renovating County Line Square to create a well-defined and attractive pedestrian-oriented development. A wide range of commercial developments should be encouraged in County Line Square. The redevelopment and repositioning of County Line Square as an attractive destination-based town center, represents one of the biggest development challenges that will face the Village in the coming years. However, it also represents a unique opportunity for Village officials to act proactively in creating the kind of community focal point that many residents believe is currently missing in Burr Ridge. 

The German Church Road Subarea

The German Church Road subarea is located south of German Church Road and east of County Line Road. Most of this area is expected to someday become part of the Village. This portion of Burr Ridge’s planning area contains rolling terrain punctuated by areas of steep slopes, woodlands and floodplains. Portions of this area have developed for residential purposes under Cook County zoning. 

Recognizing that Burr Ridge is a community of identified subdivisions, new development within this subarea should take on a specific residential character that is consistent with the lot sizes of surrounding developments such as Arrowhead Farm. It is also desirable that new residential subdivisions take advantage of the unique characteristics of the terrain. This suggests a need for a variety of lot sizes and the consideration of the transfer of density within a traditional subdivision development to preserve open space. 

Community Design

The Comprehensive Plan recommends that the Village seek to establish a distinctive visual character for the Village's major gateways and transportation corridors. The principal and secondary gateways leading into Burr Ridge should be enhanced through a combination of signage and landscaping. The signage should be rustic in appearance in order to reflect the desired rural character of Burr Ridge. The landscape material should be native to the area and consist of a mixture of shrubs and perennials with a variety of color and blooming trees. Similarly, streetscape enhancements should build upon the Village's desire for a rural character along the continuous streets that define the main edges of the community. 

Burr Ridge has grown as a collection of subdivisions that maintain their own individual identities. While individuality is an important aspect of the community's identity, many residents also want to establish a common Burr Ridge identity. One way to do this would be to encourage individual subdivisions to adopt a common unifying theme or common materials in their entryway signs. Consideration should be given to amending the Subdivision Ordinance to implement this recommendation by establishing a palette of materials or other common elements that must be incorporated into subdivision entrance signage. Older subdivisions should be encouraged to adopt such unifying elements as old entryway signs are replaced. 

Transportation and Circulation

Burr Ridge is served by both a local and regional roadway network which allows easy access into and out of the community. Street connections and extensions should be provided, where appropriate, in order to improve residential circulation within the Village. The purpose of these street connections should be to improve connections between residential neighborhoods and not to encourage cut through traffic within the neighborhoods. 

Burr Ridge currently possesses a loose network of sidewalks and on-road trails but lacks an overall system of pedestrian and bicycle pathways. The main objectives of the pathway plan are to serve local residents and strengthen the sense of community by connecting neighborhoods to local destinations such as parks, schools, shopping centers and community centers. 

Community Facilities and Services

One of the issues that faces Burr Ridge in its effort to establish a clear community identity is the preponderance of overlapping tax districts of the various governmental units and utilities that provide services to Burr Ridge residents. The number of these districts significantly limit a "sense of community" by precluding a common sharing of institutional resources. However, there are also opportunities to build upon elements that create a strong community image. Toward this end, community facilities that serve all Burr Ridge Residents should be encouraged. Specifically, the Plan recommends exploring the potential for providing Village library services to better serve Burr Ridge residents. 

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IMPLEMENTATION

The Comprehensive Plan is a guide that can help the Village of Burr Ridge fulfill its vision. Implementation of its recommendations will require the use of a variety of approaches, but because no plan implements itself, the most important resource is people. Recommendations without active support groups are seldom enacted. In Burr Ridge, several groups will need to continue to be involved in furthering the Comprehensive Plans recommendations, including the Plan Commission & Zoning Board of Appeals, Economic Development Committee and the Pathway Commission. Other groups may emerge, as specific issues become important. 

The Village Board is probably the most critical group in ensuring that the Burr Ridge continues to grow and prosper in accordance with the spirit of the Comprehensive Plan. The Village Board passes the ordinances that enable recommendations to go forward and approves their financing and support. Ultimately, any of the Plan's recommendations must come before the Board and be supported before any serious action can be taken. The Comprehensive Plan provides continuity and a context for addressing the challenges that lie ahead.

1. INTRODUCTION

This Comprehensive Plan represents the Village of Burr Ridge’s vision for the future and serves as a guide for its physical, economic, environmental and social development. The Plan considers land use and development policies for the incorporated portions of Burr Ridge and areas that may be annexed to the Village of Burr Ridge in the future. The limits of Burr Ridge’s planning area include unincorporated land within the area generally bounded by Flagg Creek and Interstate Route I-294 on the east, the Des Plaines River on the south, Robert Kingery Highway (Route 83) and Madison Street on the west and 55th Street on the north. Several distinct geographic areas fall within the Burr Ridge jurisdictional planning area including the Babson Park West residential neighborhood located north of Interstate Route I-55 and east of Madison Street, residential subdivisions, industrial areas and vacant land located east of Robert Kingery Highway extending south to the Des Plaines River, and vacant and improved residential land along either side of County Line Road located south of 79th Street. Also included within Burr Ridge’s planning area are several pockets of unincorporated land which are bordered on all sides by the Village of Burr Ridge. 

The Comprehensive Plan provides a framework to preserve and protect the existing built environment and to guide future growth so that it is compatible with the quality of existing development in Burr Ridge. To this end, the Plan is a guide for future policy decisions for Burr Ridge and its planning area. 

The Comprehensive Plan considers land use patterns and development trends within Burr Ridge as well as in its adjacent planning area. The plan addresses residential, commercial and industrial development, open space policy, community design, community facilities, new growth areas and transportation issues. It provides guidelines for enhancing and maintaining the overall physical and environmental character of the Village.  

The Comprehensive Plan is organized into nine chapters. Chapter 2 establishes the framework of the Plan and includes a community vision statement as well as the main goals and objectives of the Plan. Chapter 3 presents an overview of Burr Ridge and describes the existing conditions and development trends, which provide the context for the Comprehensive Plan’s recommendations. The goals and objectives have been grouped under five categories, namely, the Land Use Plan, Subarea Plans, Community Design, Transportation and Circulation, and Community Facilities. Each of these categories then forms a separate chapter of the Comprehensive Plan. The respective chapters recommend specific actions and plans to achieve the goals identified for each component. Finally, the implementation chapter suggests alternative resources and techniques that can be used to realize the recommendations in the Comprehensive Plan. The Appendix includes a discussion of the results of the key person interviews, focus groups and the community survey that formed the public participation process used to identify key community issues and attitudes.  

Implementation of the Comprehensive Plan is intended to protect the Village’s residential character and ensure the continuance of a strong tax base which will enable the Village to maintain and improve existing levels of services and public facilities for its residents.

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Village Board of Trustees: Village President Jo Irmen, Trustees Dolores Cizek, Elaine Milota, Tom Needham, Dan Pallat, Al Paveza and Amy Rohner

Plan Commission: Bob Sodikoff, Chairman, Bruce Bozich, Lee Coppoletta, Guy Franzese, Bob Grela, Mike McTigue, Sam Nakib and Kathy Sperlak

Comprehensive Plan Steering Committee: Jo Irmen, Village President, Bob Grela, Plan Commissioner, Rob Humpf, Chairman, Environmental Quality Commission, Elaine Milota, Trustee, Trustee Tom Needham, Chairman, Economic Development Committee, Dan Pallat, Trustee, Amy Rohner, Trustee, Bob Sodikoff, Plan Commission Chairman, Maureen Wott, Chairperson,Pathway Commission,

Village Staff: Steve Stricker, Village Administrator, Doug Pollock, AICP,Community Development Director, Planning Consultant: Camiros, Ltd.

2. COMMUNITY VISION

Burr Ridge is a high quality suburban community with low density neighborhoods characterized by distinctive homes in natural wooded settings.  Our Village accommodates residents who seek a sense of privacy in a tranquil environment. We desire to enhance the Village’s physical beauty, keeping Burr Ridge a very special place. 

GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

1.      Land Use Plan

1.1    Residential Development

Maintain the existing residential environment that is characterized by high quality housing and low density neighborhoods in a wooded setting. 

  • Maintain and encourage predominantly single family developments with limited expansion of, appropriately located, non-single family developments.
  • Maintain and encourage low density residential developments with a variety of lot sizes. Lot sizes are encouraged to be 30,000 square feet or larger.
  • Promote distinctive and upscale residential developments with high architectural quality.
  • Maintain, preserve and create additional wooded areas and other natural features in the existing and future residential developments, giving special consideration to topographical and flood plain conditions.
  • Require appropriate transitional uses and/or landscape screening between residential developments and adjacent different land uses. 

1.2    Commercial/Industrial Development

Commercial and industrial developments should strengthen and maintain property values and provide a strong tax base for the Village.

  • Maintain the existing industrial parks in the Village to appropriate standards and enhance them as a continued tax base for the Village.
  • Facilitate development of only those commercial/industrial uses that generate traffic patterns that do not significantly impact the existing residential environment.

1.3 Open Space

Preserve and enhance the natural wooded character of the community.

  • Maintain and preserve ravines, woodlands, wetlands and flood plains in the Village, especially in the southern portions and the German Church Road subarea.
  • Encourage the use of conservation easements as a method of preserving existing open spaces and wooded areas.
  • Require that new development projects be built in accordance with the Burr Ridge Special Flood Hazard Ordinance.

1.4 New Growth Areas

New growth areas should be developed with high quality, low density residential uses consistent with the character of the Village of Burr Ridge.

  • Define long-term Village of Burr Ridge boundaries, and actively seek appropriate boundary agreements with neighboring communities.
  • Integrate new growth areas with the existing fabric of the Village. This might require that previously developed areas be encouraged to conform  with Burr Ridge development standards upon annexation.
  • Develop plans to maintain and improve older county subdivisions that have been, or will be, annexed into the Village.

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2.   Subarea Plans

The development of the remaining large tracts of vacant land in the Village and its planning area should enhance the image of Burr Ridge as an upscale residential community and a prestigious business address.

  • Facilitate development of the vacant parcels in the Burr Ridge Corporate Park
  • Reconfigure County Line Square as the Village Center by developing a wide range of neighborhood/convenience shopping and institutional uses consistent with the needs of the community
  • Upgrade and renovate County Line Square to create a well defined, attractive and pedestrian oriented development
  • Annex the German-Church Road subarea to Burr Ridge and ensure its development is sensitive to the significant natural features of the site. 

3.   Community Design

Enhance the community’s image by creating a distinctive visual character for the main entrance corridors to the Village of Burr Ridge.

  • Landscape and develop the County Line Road and Frontage Road intersections, north and south of the Route I-55 interchange, the South Frontage Road and 91st Street right-of-way intersections with Robert Kingery Highway, and the Madison Street and Plainfield Road intersection as gateways to the community. Establish signage to identify other main entrance points into Burr Ridge.
  • Encourage individual subdivisions to design their entryway signs to include common features from the Village’s entrance signage, in order to unify and identify the subdivisions as being part of Burr Ridge.
  • Landscape the frontage roads to define and enhance their connections with County Line Road and buffer Interstate Route I-55.
  • Enhance the appearance of arterial streets within Burr Ridge.
  • Preserve the existing estate-type character of County Line Road in accordance with the County Line Road Overlay District, as amended through March, 1955.
  • Develop a continuous natural open space area along the Des Plaines River to define the southern edge of the Burr Ridge planning area.
  • Encourage tree planting on public and private property to enhance the wooded character of Burr Ridge.
  • Encourage burial of utility lines

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4.   Transportation and Circulation

Control traffic volumes and patterns so that they do not adversely impact residential areas

  • Maintain and develop roads, streets and highways in proper scale with their intended uses and adjacent land uses, to ensure that they can safely handle present and anticipated traffic volumes.
  • Encourage non-residential land uses that enhance the Village tax base yet attract minimal non-local traffic.
  • Provide for through vehicular traffic on major arterials with minimum inconvenience to residents.
  • Encourage the connection of residential growth areas to the existing Burr Ridge circulation system.
  • Promote development of low volume residential roadways to maintain privacy and tranquil environment.
  • Provide street extensions and connections between residential neighborhoods, as appropriate, to improve circulation within the Village.
  • Establish and maintain a pedestrian and bicycle pathway system in the Village, which connects the neighborhoods to community facilities such as parks, schools, shopping centers and community centers.
  • Encourage and maintain access to public transportation. 

5.   Community Facilities and Services

Encourage shared community facilities that serve all Burr Ridge residents.

  • Maintain existing, and encourage additional, recreational facilities that serve residents of all age groups.
  • Encourage park districts to provide each Burr Ridge neighborhood with open space and neighborhood parks.
  • Encourage effective coordination between local park districts.
  • Consider providing a community house or some other common facility available to all residents, preferably with a central location in the Burr Ridge Corporate Park.
  • Explore the potential for providing common Village library services for all Burr Ridge residents, preferably located in the Burr Ridge Corporate Park.
  • Encourage residents to convert from individual wells and septic systems to Village water and sanitary sewer systems.
  • Encourage the routine maintenance of privately-owned detention ponds to insure that storm water detention capacity is adequate, in order to minimize flooding

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3. OVERVIEW

The Burr Ridge Comprehensive Plan reflects the realities of the present and the historic character of the community. Existing conditions and development trends provide the context for the Comprehensive Plan’s goals and objectives. In order to understand the community context, existing land use, zoning classifications, environmental conditions, roadway networks, community facilities and services, population characteristics, and economic growth potential were all considered in the planning process. These topics are discussed throughout the Plan, with basic data describing land use, demographic and housing characteristics, and economic base summarized in this chapter. 

Burr Ridge is surrounded by undeveloped land and other municipalities, as shown in Figure 1: Village Jurisdictions Map. The community straddles the Cook and DuPage County line, with County Line Road forming the main entryway to the Village. As a result of a number of annexations over the forty year history of Burr Ridge, the Village boundaries have grown in an irregular fashion with a number of jagged edges and unincorporated parcels that are wholly surrounded by Burr Ridge. 

Since its initial incorporation as the Village of Harvester in 1956, and the formation of the Village of Burr Ridge in 1962, Burr Ridge has sought to guide its own destiny as an upscale community with a strong rural character. However, Burr Ridge is not “rural” in the true sense of the word, since it cannot trace its roots to an agricultural heritage like some of its neighbors. Rather, “rural” is more reflective of a natural environment with woodlands, wildlife, interesting topography, and a sense of privacy that evolved out of a collection of early Cook County and DuPage County subdivisions built on former farms. 

Burr Ridge has grown as a bedroom community with a character that is distinctly different from its neighbors. The community’s existing land use and development pattern, demographic and housing characteristics and economic base provide the physical and social context within which the Comprehensive Plan provides guidance. These topics are discussed in the remainder of this chapter. 

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3.1   Existing Land Use

Figure 2: Existing Land Use Map, shows the general pattern of existing land use in the Village of Burr Ridge and surrounding unincorporated areas likely to be annexed to Burr Ridge. The following discussion focuses first on the land use pattern within the current Village of Burr Ridge municipal limits. This section concludes with an overall discussion of the land use pattern within that area considered to be the ultimate Village boundaries. 

Land Use within Burr Ridge

Over the years, the incorporated portions of the Village of Burr Ridge have grown as a result of annexation. As evident from Table 1, the land area of the Village of Burr Ridge has shown a significant increase over the last three decades, growing by approximately 169%, or 2,639 acres, between 1964 and 1999.  Over this period the amount of developed acreage has grown for all land use types except for industrial. The lower percentage of industrial land use appears to stem largely from changes in land classification, since commercial and office/research were not identified as separate land use categories in the 1964 comprehensive plan. However, there still has been a real decrease in the number of acres devoted to industrial, office and commercial uses, declining from 441 acres in 1964 to 415 acres in 1999.

TABLE 1: EXISTING LAND USE WITHIN INCORPORATED VILLAGE OF BURR RIDGE

Land Use Type
1999
1964
Area in Acres % of Total Area Area in Acres % of Total Area
Single Family
1,822.1
43.42
324.2
20.80
Multiple Family
92.4
2.2
0
0
Commercial
34.6
0.82
0
0
Office Research
48.4
1.15
0
0
Industrial
331.5
7.9
441
28.3
Community Facilities
94.5
2.25
43
2.76
Parks & Open Space
307.4
7.32
1.0
0.06
Transportation, Waterways & Utilities
821.7
19.58
170
10.91
Vacant
644.4
15.36
578.8
37.13
Total
4,197
100%
1,558
100%

The Village’s zoning ordinance defines seventeen districts for residential, commercial, industrial, office and research-assembly and transitional uses. The zoning districts generally follow the existing land use patterns. Most conform to the notion of buffering high intensity uses with moderate intensity uses, rather than having low intensity uses and high intensity uses side-by-side. For example, the Village buffers light industrial uses with business uses or higher density residential. 

Single family residential is the largest single land use, occupying 43% of the land in Burr Ridge. This category accounted for nearly 57% of the increase in the Village’s land area between 1964 and 1999. Commercial and office and community facilities have also shown a modest percentage increase. In contrast, the percentage of the Village occupied by industrial uses showed a sharp percentage decrease from 28% to 8% of the total land area over this period.  

Although industrial land use has decreased as a percentage of total land area, it represents the second largest land use category in Burr Ridge. This is a reflection of the easy access to major transportation thoroughfares. There are seven business parks including Brush Hill Trust, Burr Ridge Corporate Park, Burr Ridge Industrial Commons, Burr Ridge Park (Tower Drive), High Grove and the Hinsdale Industrial Park. The majority of these parks can be found just north of I-55, both east and west of County Line Road, and south of I-55, both east and west of Madison Street. 

Most retail uses are found in the County Line Square shopping center located in the Burr Ridge Corporate Park and to the east of Madison Street along Frontage Road. Retail uses are geared to the convenience shopping needs of residents and office workers and include restaurants, a local mini-mart, dry cleaner and florist. Small professional offices are found on the west side of County Line Road between I-55 and 77th Avenue. Larger office buildings are concentrated in the Burr Ridge Corporate Park. 

Land devoted to parks and open space has increased substantially since 1964, and included 307.4 acres in 1999. Vacant land within the Village has grown as a result of annexation of land intended for residential use and, in 1999, consisted of approximately 644 acres. The increase in the amount of land within the Village devoted to transportation, waterways and utilities is mostly a reflection of streets built to serve new developments on previously vacant land. 

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Land Use Within the Burr Ridge Planning Area

Since Burr Ridge first began planning for its future growth, its potential expansion area has become smaller as a result of annexations by surrounding municipalities and municipal  boundary agreements. Table 2 presents the estimated acreage of the various land uses within Burr Ridge’s planning area in 1999, and compares these totals with similar information from 1982 and 1964. Data for 1964 and 1982 were obtained from the comprehensive plans prepared during these years.  

The total planning area, as illustrated in Table 2, decreased by 36% or 3,289 acres between 1964 and 1999. Much of the decrease in the planning area boundary between 1964 and 1982 resulted from the decision to move the southern limits of the planning area from the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal to the Des Plaines River. Subsequent reductions in the planning area primarily reflect annexations by surrounding communities that have reduced the amount of land that may eventually become part of Burr Ridge.

TABLE 2: BURR RIDGE PLANNING AREA LAND USE TRENDS

Land Use Type
1995
1982
1982
Area in Acres
% of Total Area
Area in Acres
% of Total Area
Area in Acres
% of Total Area
Single Family
2,525
44.44
3,005
43.13
1,831.1
20.17
Multiple Family
92.4
1.63
113
1.62
12.5
0.14
Commercial
42.1
0.74
77
1.11
186.2
2.05
Office Research
49.5
0.87
510
7.32
2.6
0.03
Industrial
441.5
7.77
475
6.82
482.6
5.32
Community Facilities
514.9
9.06
191
2.74
871.2
9.60
Transportation, Waterways & Utilities
1,128.2
19.86
989
14.20
1,302.6
14.35
Vacant
88.4
15.64
1,607
23.07
4,388.2
48.34
Total
5,682
100%
6,967
100%
9,077
100%

A careful study of Table 2 reveals several anomalies in otherwise consistent land use trends. Examples include single-family, multiple family, and office/research where the acreage devoted to these uses was higher in 1982 than in either 1964 or 1999. These fluctuations probably reflect the annexations of existing residential areas and commercial uses in the 1964 planning area by neighboring communities and/or discrepancies in the commercial and office/research use classifications in 1982. 

Community facilities include parks, schools and institutional uses. In 1964, parks and open space occupied 871 acres, compared with 191 acres in 1982 and 515 acres in 1999. The 1964 park acreage included forest preserve land along the Des Plaines River that was excluded from the 1982 planning area. 

Institutional uses occupied 463.6 acres in 1964 compared to 94 acres in 1982. Most likely, this decrease is the result of the annexation of several county club facilities on the periphery of the 1964 planning area by neighboring communities and the reclassification of the Bridewell Prison Farm for residential use, prior to its annexation to Burr Ridge as a mixed use development. 

The amount of vacant land within Burr Ridge’s planning area has shown a significant decrease over the last three decades, from 4,388 acres in 1964 to 888 acres in 1999. Vacant land occupied nearly half the planning area of the Village in 1964. In 1999, vacant land accounted for only approximately 16% of the total area. 

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3.2    Demographic and Housing Characteristics

Demographic patterns and housing characteristics help to distinguish one community from another and describe the community context for the Comprehensive Plan’s development. Population growth, average household size, income, occupation and housing characteristics are among the community indicators commonly used in planning. This section describes population growth trends and demographic and housing characteristics abstracted from U.S Census data. 

Population Growth

The population of Burr Ridge was 9,341 in 1995, and has shown a significant increase over the past few decades. The population of Burr Ridge more than doubled in each of its first three decades of existence, as shown in Table 3. Much of this growth was a result of development of existing vacant land and annexation of adjacent areas. The rate of population growth slowed between 1990 and 1995, with a total population increase of 22% during that period.  

Future population growth in Burr Ridge will be primarily a function of annexation of existing residential subdivisions and new residential developments. Given the current pace and type of residential development, it is unlikely that there will be dramatic increases in the residential population when the next census is taken in 2000. The Northeastern Illinois Planning Commission projects a Burr Ridge population of approximately 16,300 in the year 2020. Achieving this population threshold would require the annexation of most of the residential land in Burr Ridge’s planning area and new residential development on the remaining vacant land at densities comparable to recent Burr Ridge residential subdivisions.

TABLE 3: BURR RIDGE POPULATION GROWTH

Year Population Percentage Population Change (%)
1995 9,341 22
1990 7,684 100
1980 3,833 134
1970 1,637 386

Source: U. S. Census,  Village of Burr Ridge- Economic Profile

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Household Size

The size of Burr Ridge households has been decreasing over the past few decades, which is consistent with the national trend.  There were 2,901 households within the Village in 1995.  The average household size was 3.2 in 1980 and 2.96 in 1995. Smaller households may reflect the decisions of individual couples to have fewer children or may reflect the overall aging of a community where parents, whose children are grown continue to live in Burr Ridge. Fewer children may reduce the need for new schools. However, smaller households also mean that more occupied housing units will be needed to maintain the current population. 

TABLE 4: HOUSEHOLD SIZE

 
1980
1990
1995
Persons in Households
3,833
7,555
8,582
Households
1,198
2,389
2,901
Average Household Size
3.20
3.16
2.96

Source: U.S. Census

Age Distribution

Age distribution patterns help describe the kind of households that make up Burr Ridge. In 1995, the largest age group consisted of persons between 45 to 64 years of age. The second largest age group included those with ages between 25 to 44 years. The percentage of the school going population (5 to 18 years) increased between 1990 and 1995, recovering from the decline between 1980 and 1990. The senior population (65 and over) steadily increased between 1990 and 1995.  All other age groups showed a modest decrease in their percentage share of the total population during the same period. The age distribution pattern in Burr Ridge generally describes a mix of older households with grown children and younger families with school age children.

TABLE 5: AGE DISTRIBUTION

 
Percentage of Population (%)
Age Group
1980
1990
1995
0 to 4
6.1
6.5
5.7
5 to 18
26.5
20.7
24.2
19 to 24
5.3
4.5
3.9
25 to 44
29.0
27.2
23.0
45 to 64
26.3
33.6
30.6
65 and over
6.8
7.2
8.4

Source: U.S. Census; Village of Burr Ridge- Economic Profile

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Household Income

Household income is one common measure of a community’s affluence. The median household income of Burr Ridge was $87,078 in 1989 and was substantially higher than that of the neighboring communities and DuPage and Cook County.  The Burr Ridge median income was nearly twice that of DuPage County and nearly three times that of Cook County.

TABLE 6: MEDIAN INCOME-BURR RIDGE AND NEIGHBORING PLACES, 1989

City/County
Median Incomes ($)
Burr Ridge
87,078
Hinsdale
68,518
Darien
52,875
Willowbrook
50,294
DuPage County
48,876
Willow Springs
47,234
Indian Head Park
44,517
Cook County
32,673

Source: U.S. Census 1990

Race

The majority (91%) of the Burr Ridge population is white. Asians and Pacific Islanders make up most of the minority population of the community.

TABLE 7: RACE, 1990

Race
Percentage of Population (%)
White
90.6
African-American
0.7
American Indian, Eskimo, Aleut
0.0
Asian, Pacific Islander
8.5
Other
0.2

Source: U.S. Census, 1990

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Occupation

Employment characteristics are an important indicator of the social and economic diversity of a community and its residents. The majority (84%) of the population of Burr Ridge consists of professionals. More than half of Burr Ridge residents who are employed are in a managerial or professional specialty occupation, while one-third of the population is employed in technical, sales, administration and support professions.

TABLE 8: EMPLOYEMENT BY OCCUPATION, 1990

Occupation Population Percentage of Population (%)
Managerial & Professional Specialty Occupation 1,959 52.0
Technical, Sales, Administration & Support Occupations 1,218 32.3
Service Occupations 157 4.1
Farming, Forestry & Fishing 17 0.5
Precision Production, Craft & Repair Occupations 207 5.5
Operators, Fabricators & Laborers 213 5.6

Source: U.S. Census, 1990

Education

Burr Ridge is a community of well educated residents. Most Burr Ridge adult residents have attended college. Nearly half (47%) of the population has a four year college degree, another 6% have an associate degree, and nearly a quarter (23%) while not having earned a degree, have had some college education.

TABLE 9: EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT PERSONS 25 YEARS OLD AND OLDER

Education Population Percentage of Population (%)
Less Than Ninth Grade 124 2.5
Ninth to Twelfth Grade (no diploma) 196 4.0
High School Graduate 851 17.4
Some College, No Degree 1,119 2.29
Associate Degree 295 6.0
Bachelors Degree 1,354 27.7
Graduate or Professional Degree 956 19.5

Source: U.S. Census, 1990

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Age of Housing Stock

Burr Ridge is a relatively young community and the age of the housing stock reflects this. Only 15.5% of the housing in Burr Ridge was built before 1960. 

In 1990, there were 2,299 residential buildings in Burr Ridge according U. S. Census figures. Since 1990, an additional 659 residential structures have been added according to the Village of Burr Ridge. The total number of buildings by age of the housing stock is shown in Table 10. More than half of the total housing stock in the Village was built between 1970 and 1989. Approximately 22% of the total housing in Burr Ridge is less than 10 years old.

TABLE 10: YEAR STRUCTURE BUILT

Year Number of Residential Buildings Percent of Total (%)
Jan-July 1998 59 1.9
1997 111 3.7
1996 80 2.7
1995 80 2.7
1994 104 3.5
1993 77 2.6
1992 66 2.2
1991 51 1.7
1990 31 1.0
1985-1989 627 21.2
1980-1984 369 12.5
1970-1979 526 17.8
1690-1969 317 10.7
1950-1959 312 10.5
1940-1949 113 3.8
1930 & Earlier 35 1.2
Total Buildings 2,958  

Source: Burr Ridge Building Permit Records (1990-1998); U.S. Census, 1990)

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Housing Type

The vast majority of housing in Burr Ridge is owner-occupied. Only 3.4% of the occupied housing units in Burr Ridge are rental units. Home ownership rates are often used as an indication of neighborhood stability, since homeowners tend to take a more active interest in their communities.

TABLE 11: HOUSING, 1990 

  Number Of Units Percentage Of Population
Total Housing Units 2628  
Occupied 2378 90.5

Owner Occupied

1992

83.8

Rental

80

3.4
Vacant 250 9.5

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 1990

3.3    Economic Base

There are over 400 businesses in Burr Ridge. According to the Village’s 1995 Economic Profile the 20 largest employers accounted for more than 3,000 jobs. However, jobs are not the only measure of the strength of a community’s economic base. Equally important are the sales and property tax revenues produced by thriving local businesses. Although retail shopping is limited within Burr Ridge, the Village receives significant annual sales tax revenue as a result of the presence of major retail suppliers including W. W. Grainger and several pharmaceutical concerns. 

The ten companies generating the most sales tax contributed $1,178,772 in sales tax revenue to Burr Ridge in 1997. This amount represented 62% of all sales tax received by the Village during 1997. Only one of these businesses was a traditional retail operation. 

Commercial, office and industrial uses occupy approximately 10% of Burr Ridge’s land area, but represent approximately 20% of Burr Ridge’s property tax base. Most of the developed commercial and industrial land is located in the DuPage County portion of Burr Ridge, in part a reflection of the impact of the disparity in assessment practices between Cook County and DuPage County. 

In DuPage County, all property is assessed at 33% of market value. In Cook County, single family residential property is assessed at 16% of market value, industrial property is assessed at 36% of market value, and commercial property is assessed at 38% of market value. In order to insure uniformity among the various counties within Illinois, the State of Illinois applies an equalization factor to the assessed values in each county. For most counties, including DuPage County, the state multiplier is 1.0. The state multiplier for Cook County has been approximately 2.0 for most of the past decade (for the 1997 tax year the Cook County equalization factor was 2.1489). This effectively doubles the property assessments for commercial and industrial property in Cook County over similarly valued commercial and industrial property in DuPage County. While Cook County maintains a successful incentive program to off-set this tax disparity for industrial development, similar property tax relief is not generally available for commercial developments such as hotels, offices or retail shopping centers.  

The Cook County Assessor has established a tax force that is exploring assessment reforms to make Cook County a more competitive location for commercial developments. However, so long as the present system is in place, commercial development in the Cook County portion of Burr Ridge is expected to remain problematic. This issue is of particular significance since most of the remaining vacant land zoned for industrial and commercial use is located in the Cook County portion of Burr Ridge, mainly in the Burr Ridge Corporate Park.

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4. LAND USE PLAN

The proposed land use for Burr Ridge is shown in Figure 3: Future Land Use Plan. The land use plan reflects the Village of Burr Ridge’s vision for its future development and largely continues existing development patterns. It is based on four major goals which are articulated in the Goals and Policies chapter, as follows: 

  • Maintain the existing spacious residential environment characterized by high quality housing and low density neighborhoods in a wooded setting.
  • Facilitate commercial and industrial development within the framework of the existing business and industrial parks so as to strengthen and maintain property values and provide a strong tax base for the Village.
  • Preserve and enhance the natural wooded character of the community
  • Develop new growth areas with high quality, low density residential uses, consistent with the character of the Village. 

4.1 Residential Development

Burr Ridge is a relatively young community and most of the housing stock is relatively new. More than half of the total housing stock, consisting of 2,958 residential buildings in 1998, was built between 1970 and 1989, while another 22% of the total is less than 10 years old. Approximately 90% of the housing in Burr Ridge is owner-occupied. 

The majority of Burr Ridge can be categorized as single family residential on a variety of lot sizes. Large lots, which are approximately one acre or more in size, are located throughout the Village but more prominently between German Church Road and 79th Street, just east of County Line Road, and areas surrounding the intersection of Plainfield Road and County Line Road. Smaller single family lots tend to be located in the southern portions of the Village, west of County Line Road and south of 81st Street, and in the Babson Park neighborhood located north of Interstate Route I-55, between County Line Road and Madison Street. These lots are generally one-half acre in size. 

Townhouse developments are found throughout the village and include Carriage Way, Chasemoor, Chestnut Hills, Tartan Ridge, Oak Creek and the King Bruwaert senior housing development. 

The few traditional multi-family residential developments within Burr Ridge are located along Carriage Way, just east of County Line Road and on Garfield Avenue between 79th Street and 81st Street. The congregate care facilities located in Burr Ridge are also considered multi-family residential for purposes of land use classification. 

It is proposed that the predominantly single family developments be maintained and encouraged, with limited expansion of, appropriately located, non-single family residential developments. The existing general pattern of housing types and low densities should be maintained, consistent with the underlying zoning. Future residential developments should be encouraged to have lot sizes of 30,000 square feet or larger. 

Future residential developments should maintain, preserve and create additional wooded areas and other natural features, giving special consideration to topographical and floodplain conditions. Innovative design for residential site development that is sensitive to existing topography and natural features should be encouraged. In certain instances, the Village will consider allowing a transfer of density to achieve such development. Distinctive and upscale residential developments with high architectural quality should be promoted. 

Residential uses should be buffered from existing or proposed non-residential uses by landscaped screening or transitional uses.  The Zoning Ordinance designates transitional districts that serve as a buffer between residential and non-residential uses, and ensure that future growth of non-residential uses do not negatively impact residential areas. These transitional zones should be developed consistently with the provisions in the Zoning Ordinance. Utility line right-of-way or easements can also be used as buffers and can, in limited instances, accommodate a pedestrian-bike linkage between park areas. 

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4.2       Commercial and Industrial Development

Industrial use is the second largest land use category in Burr Ridge, a reflection of easy access to major transportation thoroughfares. There are seven business parks in the Village, specifically, Brush Hill Trust, Burr Ridge Corporate Park, Burr Ridge Industrial Commons, Burr Ridge Park (Tower Drive), High Grove and the Hinsdale Industrial Park. The majority of these parks can be found just north of I-55, both east and west of County Line Road, and south of I-55, both east and west of Madison Street. 

Office uses are concentrated in the Burr Ridge Corporate Park, north of I-55 along the west side of County Line Road, and South Frontage Road near 83rd Street and Robert Kingery Highway. Larger office buildings are concentrated in the Burr Ridge Corporate Park. 

Small professional offices and a funeral home are found on the west side of County Line Road between I-55 and 77th Avenue in the T-1 Transitional zoning district. The T-1 Transitional district is intended to provide a buffer between commercial uses along Frontage Road as well as in the Burr Ridge Corporate Park and the single family residential uses located south of 75th Street and west of County Line Road. The office buildings in the T-1 Transitional District have been designed with residential architectural features to achieve this transition.  

Two hotels are located along Frontage Road near the Interstate Route I-55 and County Line Road interchange. A hotel is planned for a site in the Burr Ridge Corporate Park and another hotel is planned for the Oak Grove Subdivision located at the northwest interchange of I-55 and County Line Road. These hotels cater to business travelers to the Burr Ridge area as well as serving as one of the first upscale hotel locations west of Midway Airport. Burr Ridge hotels also frequently accommodate overflow convention traffic from Chicago. 

Most retail uses are found in the County Line Square shopping center located within the Burr Ridge Corporate Park and to the south of 83rd Street along South Frontage Road. Retail uses are geared to the convenience shopping needs of residents and office workers and include restaurants, a local mini-mart, a dry cleaner and a florist.  

The existing industrial parks and commercial developments should be maintained and enhanced to appropriate standards for a continued strong tax base for the Village. The development of vacant parcels within the Burr Ridge Corporate Park should be facilitated. However, commercial uses that have minimal traffic impact on surrounding residential areas should be emphasized. County Line Square should be renovated and developed with a wide range of neighborhood andconvenience shopping or community uses, consistent with the needs of village residents. Development plans and guidelines for both these areas are discussed in the Subarea chapter of the Comprehensive Plan. 

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4.3    Open Space

The three primary natural features in Burr Ridge include woodlands, steep slopes, and floodplains. These are related to the Des Plaines River and the creeks that run throughout the Burr Ridge area. 

Woodlands are one of Burr Ridge’s strongest assets and help to define the community’s natural character. These areas provide a scenic and rural quality to the community and help blend the higher density residential subdivisions with large five acre lots scattered throughout the Village and its planning area. The majority of the woodland areas can be found in the southern portion of Burr Ridge, in and around the floodplains and steep slopes. They are especially concentrated in the German Church Road area, which is relatively undeveloped. These woodlands should be maintained and preserved, especially by the future development of the German Church Road subarea. 

Steep slopes are characterized as either moderately sloping or steeply sloping. Slopes that are between 7% and 14% are characterized as moderately sloping while anything with a 15% or greater slope are characterized as steeply sloping. Developing land that is classified as moderately to steeply sloping is generally discouraged due to impacts such as increased surface water run-off and erosion, though these can be mitigated through the flattening of the slopes.  While the northern portion of Burr Ridge is relatively flat, the southern portion of the Village is very hilly and contains much slope variation, which can be attributed to Flagg Creek and the Des Plaines River. Future developments, especially in the southern sections and the German Church Road subarea, should be designed to respect the existing land topography. 

Floodplains are designated by FEMA, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, in the Federal Insurance Rate Maps (FIRM). Floodplains are defined as those lands subject to inundation by the 100-year and 500-year frequency floods. The 100-year floodplain represents areas that have a one percent chance of flooding every year. This is, however, an estimate, and floods have been known to occur more frequently than the designations suggest. While it is generally recommended that floodplain land not be developed, many of Burr Ridge’s floodplain areas are already developed. The floodplain in Burr Ridge is primarily along the Des Plaines River and along Flagg Creek. The floodplains affect mostly the southern portion of the Village from I-55 south to the Des Plaines River. To prevent adverse impacts on these floodplains, all new development projects should be constructed in accordance with the Burr Ridge Flood Hazard Ordinance. 

The preservation of open space is a key concern. Two approaches might be considered to preserve open space include the Subdivision Ordinance, and conservation easements.  

Subdivision Ordinance

The Subdivision Ordinance of Burr Ridge includes provisions to enable preservation of open fields, trees and other natural features. Through the Planned Unit Development (P.U.D.) process, developers maybe allowed to reduce required lot sizes by 10 to 20% in order to dedicate land as usable open space for all residents of that subdivision. This concept, known locally as transfer of density, is not expected to result in an overall increase in residential densities, but rather provides a flexible way of accommodating unique physical characteristics of individual development areas. 

Conservation Easements

Conservation easements should be encouraged as a method of preserving existing open spaces and wooded areas within Burr Ridge.A conservation easement is a legal agreement a property owner makes to restrict the type and amount of development that may take place on his or her property. Conservation easements are granted by property owners to protect their land or historic buildings from inappropriate development while still retaining private ownership. Each easement’s restrictions are tailored to the particular property and to the interests of the individual owner. 

Some specific advantages of a conservation easements include: 

  • Ownership Retention: The property owner retains the private ownership when granting a conservation easement on his property.
  • Flexibility: Conservation easements are designed to meet the needs and wishes of the landowners who grant them, while serving the public good by limiting development and conserving open space.
  • Income Tax Deduction: The donation of a conservation easement is an income tax deductible charitable gift, provided that the easement is perpetual and is donated exclusively for conservation purposes to a qualified conservation organization or public agency.  Internal Revenue Code Section 170(h) defines “conservation purposes” to include the preservation of open space for significant public benefit. Preservation of open space could be for scenic enjoyment or pursuant to an adopted governmental conservation policy. The value of the easement donation, is the difference in the fair market value of a property with a conservation easement and its value without the easement.
  • Estate Tax Deduction: A conservation easement can often reduce estate taxes. The value of the estate, and hence the estate tax, will be lower by the amount the conservation easement reduces the fair market value of the property.
  • Property Tax Deduction: A conservation easement, by reducing the development potential of a property, may reduce the assessment level and hence the property taxes. 

In order to qualify for the above stated deductions, the conservation easement must be a contribution of a qualified real property interest, enforceable in perpetuity, to a qualified organization exclusively for conservation purposes. Organizations that could receive easement contributions include public agencies, land conservation agencies, or historic preservation organizations that are qualified as a public charity under the Internal Revenue Code. The Village of Burr Ridge may act as the qualified organization for receiving easement donations and, in appropriate circumstances, would consider doing so. The donated property must meet at least one of the following conservation criteria:  

  • Provides for public access for recreation or outdoor education.
  • Preserves habitat for endangered or threatened species.
  • Contributes to the ecological viability of another park or natural area that is already publicly owned or otherwise protected.
  • Is identified in the Illinois Natural Areas Inventory.
  • Is eligible for the Illinois Natural Areas Registry.
  • Is part of a government policy or plan for the conservation of wildlife habitat or open space, the restoration or protection of lakes and streams, or the protection of scenic areas. 

Conservation easements should be actively encouraged along the County Line Road corridor and the German Church Road subarea, in order to preserve their natural and wooded character. Action should also be taken to consolidate and develop a continuous natural open space along the Des Plaines River to define the southern edge of the Burr Ridge planning area. 

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4.4    New Growth Areas

The planning area generally extends from 55th Street on the north, Madison Street and Illinois Route 83 on the west, Flagg Creek on the east and Des Plaines River on the south. It includes the existing boundaries of incorporated Village of Burr Ridge as well as neighboring properties which could be considered for future annexation. It also includes six pockets of relatively small unincorporated parcels located entirely within the existing Village boundaries.  The long term boundaries for the Village of Burr Ridge are depicted in Figure 1: Jurisdictional Boundary Map. Most of the potential annexation areas are designated for residential use. The German Church Road subarea, located in the southeast section of the planning area, represents the largest potential annexation area designated for new residential development. Development recommendations for this area are discussed in the Subarea Plans chapter of the Comprehensive Plan. The annexation area also include some properties designated for open space and industrial use, located south of the Northern Illinois Gas Company right of way and east of the Robert Kingery Highway (Route 83). 

The Village should actively seek appropriate boundary agreements with neighboring communities and annex the unincorporated parcels within its existing boundaries.  These new growth areas should be integrated with the existing fabric of the Village.  This might require that previously developed areas be encouraged to conform with Burr Ridge development standards upon annexation.  Plans  should be developed to maintain and improve older county subdivisions that have been or will be annexed into the Village. Street and pathway connections linking annexed subdivisions to existing Village neighborhoods is discussed in greater detail in the Transportation and Circulation chapter of the Plan.

5. SUBAREA PLANS

Two major subareas have been identified as the focus for more detailed consideration in the Comprehensive Plan: the Burr Ridge Corporate Park and the German Church Road subarea. Shown in Figure 4: Subareas Map, these subareas, one wholly within the Village and one lying within Burr Ridge’s planning area, represent the most significant remaining opportunities for additional economic and residential growth. The appropriate development of these areas is critical to the maintenance of Burr Ridge as a prestigious business address and an upscale residential community. 

The subarea plans are based on three major goals, as articulated in the Goals and Objectives section of the Comprehensive Plan. These are:  

  • Facilitate development of the vacant parcels in the Burr Ridge Corporate Park.
  • Upgrade and renovate County Line Square to create an attractive and pedestrian oriented development that includes a wide range of neighborhood/convenience shopping and institutional uses consistent with the needs of the community.
  • Annex the German-Church Road subarea to Burr Ridge and ensure that its development is sensitive to the significant natural features of the site. 

5.1 The Burr Ridge Corporate Park Subarea  

The Burr Ridge Corporate Park occupies one of the most prominent locations in Burr Ridge. Located adjacent to the Interstate Route I-55 and County Line Road interchange, the Corporate Park presents many visitors with their first image of Burr Ridge. 

The Burr Ridge Corporate Park subarea is approximately 143 acres in size and includes the County Line Square shopping area, adjacent Pace Park-n-Ride facility, and both vacant development parcels as well as improved office and commercial buildings located to the north of County Line Square.  The Burr Ridge Corporate Park was originally part of the Bridewell Prison Farm property that was annexed to the Village of Burr Ridge in 1982. The intent was to build a mixed use development that included office/research uses, a campus office park, residential uses, a hotel, and a community-oriented shopping center. The residential uses have been built outside what is now referred to as the Burr ridge Corporate Park. 

The Corporate Park Subarea plan represents a refinement of the land use designations contained in the original annexation agreement for this area, and reflects current development trends and market potential. Figure 5:  Illustrative Concept Plan - Corporate Park Subarea illustrates a range of possible uses and their recommended location within the Burr Ridge Corporate Park subarea. The intent of the subarea plan is to establish a viable mix of destination-oriented uses that meet the needs of Burr Ridge residents and office workers, and enhances the overall image of the community.  Office is the preferred use for most of the remaining vacant land. This use represents a departure from the underlying L-1 Light Industrial zoning which is currently in place for a major portion of the Corporate Park Subarea. While office uses are allowed under the present zoning, industrial uses are also permitted which are not consistent with the development pattern that has been encouraged in the Corporate Park Subarea since its annexation into the Village of Burr Ridge. Consequently, the Village should encourage rezoning land within the Corporate Park to appropriate office classifications to reflect existing uses and accommodate desirable future developments. 

As stated earlier, the Corporate Park has a central and prominent location within Burr Ridge. Its location, and the existing underdeveloped land area presents a rare opportunity to develop a town center in the Village. Such a town center might help establish a sense of community by creating a visually distinctive and central Village Square that provides shared commercial and institutional facilities. Perhaps the most important element in this effort is the transformation of County Line Square from an unattractive, poorly laid-out and underutilized shopping center into a desirable community shopping area that provides the type of town center amenities that many Burr Ridge residents desire. A conceptual design for County Line Square is discussed in greater detail below. The Village Square could be further emphasized by expanding the commercial or institutional facilities to the north of County Line Square. This would result in County Line Square, the existing restaurant north of the Square, and the vacant parcel east of the restaurant forming a consolidated and coherent Village Square.  

While portions of the original mixed use project have been built, much of the land within the Burr Ridge Corporate Park remains vacant. Lack of commercial development interest is primarily due to the location of the Corporate Park in Cook County, which has different assessment practices and significantly higher property tax rates than the section of Burr Ridge in DuPage County.  The equalized assessed value of commercial property located in the Cook County portion of Burr Ridge is typically more than double that of similarly valued commercial property located in DuPage County. Several potential developments could emerge if the Village is able to provide the necessary development incentives to overcome this tax differential. 

The Village of Burr Ridge established a tax increment financing (TIF) district in 1998 to spur commercial development of several key parcels of vacant land within the Burr Ridge Corporate Park. Office uses and the currently planned hotel uses are the preferred land uses for vacant land within the Burr Ridge Parkway Redevelopment Project Area. Because these uses typically do not produce significant sales tax or other revenues that the Village could rebate as a development incentive, tax increment financing was identified as the most desirable short-term means of attracting the development intended to support the long-term economic base of local tax districts. 

Since the TIF typically limits the growth of tax revenues resulting from new development to school districts and other tax districts for a period of years, the boundaries of the tax increment financing district were drawn to include only a portion of the Corporate Park. Parcels included within the TIF district were chosen because of their strategic location within the Corporate Park and their eligibility under the State’s TIF criteria. Development incentives are expected to be used to attract desired office uses and a hotel use to the area. However, once a “critical development mass” has been achieved, the intent is to rely on normal market forces to attract additional users to other vacant and underutilized property within the Burr Ridge Corporate Park, which will directly benefit all local tax districts. The Comprehensive Plan endorses the development strategies and tax increment financing techniques recommended by the Burr Ridge Parkway Redevelopment Plan and Project. 

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County Line Square Redevelopment Concept

County Line Square is located within the Burr Ridge Corporate Park, in the southeast corner of the intersection of County Line Road and Burr Ridge Parkway.  This 7.2 acre parcel consists of a large parking expanse in the front, a linear retail building along the southern edge and a detention basin in the western corner.  The retail center includes several destination stores, a dry cleaner, and restaurants. The center is currently functioning at below capacity as evident from several vacancies and the underused parking lot. The large central former grocery store is also among the vacancies. The layout and design of the square does not promote pedestrian activity and appears to lack the vitality to sustain a successful Village shopping center. 

The Comprehensive Plan recommends upgrading and renovating County Line Square to create a well-defined and attractive pedestrian-oriented development. This could be achieved by changing the existing open, strip like character of the Square to a more enclosed shopping area, oriented around central courts. This would promote synergy between the storefronts and make the Square more pedestrian friendly. Additional improvements could include defining the entrance to the center, improving the visibility from County Line Road, facade improvements, landscaping and development of the detention pond as an attractive public space. An illustrative site plan and commercial center sketch are shown in Figures 6 & 7.

A wide range of commercial developments should be encouraged in County Line Square. These could range from restaurants to convenience retail that provides for the day-to-day shopping needs of residents (groceries, pharmacy, etc.) as well as comparison retail that includes less frequently purchased items (apparel, household furnishings, appliances, etc.). Retail services like beauty salons, dry cleaners, and dentist offices could also be located here. Other potential uses could include institutional facilities such as a public library facility and community activity centers. 

The redevelopment and repositioning of County Line Square as an attractive town center, represents one of the biggest development challenges that will face the Village in the coming years. However, it also represents a unique opportunity for Village officials to act proactively in creating the kind of community focal point that many residents believe is currently missing in Burr Ridge. 

Several alternative approaches could be adopted to implement the recommended improvements to County Line Square. The Village could create brochures and other publicity material to inform potential developers of the opportunities and incentives within the area. The Village could also consider offering sales tax rebate as These would be the most feasible implementation strategies as they would encourage development while not imposing an excessive financial burden on the Village. 

The Village could also play a proactive role in the redevelopment of County Line Square. It could act as the developer, acquiring and redeveloping the land within the shopping center. This approach would give the Village total control as to the type and timing of the development. However, this would imply a large financial commitment by the Village and a level of risk, which it might be unable or unwilling to assume. In order for this approach to succeed, an experienced retail development partner will be needed. 

Finally, the Village could take the “hands-off” approach, and wait for developer(s) to show interest in redeveloping County Line Square. This approach while resulting in the least amount of financial burden on the Village, would also imply almost no control as to the timing of the development.  

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5.2 The German Church Road Subarea

The German Church Road subarea consists of approximately 432 acres of unincorporated land which is located south of German Church Road and east of County Line Road. This portion of Burr Ridge’s planning area contains rolling terrain punctuated by areas of steep slopes, woodlands and floodplains. Portions of this area have developed for residential purposes under Cook County zoning. 

Both the Village of Willow Springs and the Village of Burr Ridge have expressed interest in annexing this area to their respective communities, with the continued residential development of the area being a common goal. Flagg Creek appears to be the most logical boundary for an annexation agreement between Burr Ridge and Willow Springs. As a matter of policy, the Village of Burr Ridge has designated Flagg Creek as the limit of its planning area to the southeast of the current municipal boundaries. Additional study of the development pattern of the existing Cook County subdivisions in this subarea may also help to define an appropriate annexation agreement boundary. 

Recognizing that Burr Ridge is a community of identified subdivisions, new development within this subarea should take on a specific residential character that is consistent with the lot sizes of surrounding developments such as Arrowhead Farm. It is also desirable that new residential subdivisions take advantage of the unique characteristics of the terrain. This suggests a need for a variety of lot sizes and the use of transfer of density within a traditional subdivision to preserve open space. 

The preferred approach in the German Church Road subarea is a mix of lot sizes, averaging 30,000 square feet in size, organized in a typical subdivision format. Larger lot subdivisions will also be encouraged. This site planning approach is reflected by the currently proposed Highland Fields development. Highland Fields is a major residential development which will occupy most of the central portion of the German Church Road subarea. It includes approximately 83 dwellings on a 75 acre site. 

The development of the remaining German Church Road subarea is suggested by the illustrative plan shown in Figure 8: Illustrative Concept Plan - German Church Road Subarea. As evident, the proposed layout and lot sizes of the site are largely dictated by the Highland Fields development. Important elements of the conceptual site plan are the proposed circulation links and pathway interconnections between new subdivisions and existing developments in this area, such as Arrowhead Farm and Highland Fields. The plan also proposes several linkages between the new residential developments so that the area does not develop as a collection of isolated subdivisions. Flagg Creek is proposed to define the natural eastern limits of the Village. The illustrative plan proposes to limit development adjacent to the Creek, in order to preserve its natural wooded character. 

A system of pathways and trails has been proposed, with the main spine running east along the Northern Illinois Gas Company right-of-way, north along Flagg Creek, and branching off in a northwest direction to join with an existing trail system along German Church Road.  A network of pedestrian trails is also proposed to link the various residential subdivisions.  

Community open space, including the location of at least one neighborhood park intended for active recreation, should be encouraged within the German-Church Road Subarea. The Village and Pleasant Dale Park District should jointly identify alternative locations for a park site approximately five acres in size. The acquisition of park land will ensure that the area is adequately served as new residential subdivisions are built. 

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Implementation

Several strategies can be used to achieve the desired development within the German Church Road subarea. 

  1. The Zoning Ordinance should be used to regulate the lot sizes and density of the residential development within the subarea, so that it is compatible with the character of the adjacent neighborhoods. The subdivision and development approval process should ensure that future development respects the topography of the site and includes high quality residential design.
  2. Residential development should respect the unique natural features and topography of the site. Conservation easements could be used to preserve the natural wooded areas. These are discussed in greater detail in the Land Use chapter of the Plan. Furthermore, the provisions under the County Line Overlay District could be used to ensure that development preserves and enhances the rural character along County Line Road.
  3. Future residential subdivisions should be interconnected by a system of streets and pathways. The Pathway Commission should ensure that adequate interconnections are provided, consistent with the policies recommended by the Pathway Plan. The Pathway Plan is included in the Transportation and Circulation chapter of the Comprehensive Plan.

5.2.1    AMENDMENT TO THE GERMAN CHURCH ROAD SUB-AREA

Subsequent to the adoption of the Village of Burr Ridge Comprehensive Plan on April 12, 1999, several actions have occurred in the German Church Road Sub-Area that have caused the Burr Ridge Plan Commission to reconsider the plan for the particular area at the southeast corner of German Church Road and County Line Road.  The area being reconsidered consists of 59 acres located south of German Church Road and east of County Line Road.  It is bounded by the Arrowhead Farm Subdivision to the east and the Highland Fields Subdivision to the south. 

Subsequent to adoption of the Comprehensive Plan, the Highland Fields Subdivision has been annexed and developed and other annexations have caused this area to be completely surrounded by the Burr Ridge corporate limits.  As a result, the Village Board of Trustees has initiated actions to unilaterally annex this area.   Additionally, there was an estate-type home built within the 59-acre area on a five- acre parcel, and the Village has received inquiries from individual property owners including another estate-style home and a proposed subdivision with one-acre lots.  The discrepancy between these various development proposals, i.e. subdivision development versus estate homes, has spurred the Plan Commission to reconsider the plan for this area and establish a more detailed plan that will provide specific direction to property owners and developers interested in future land use and development of this particular area. 

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Existing Conditions

The most significant conditions that impact the future development of this 59-acre area are the existence of substantial woodlands, ravines, and wildlife in its northern 40 acres (eight parcels). These environmental conditions have been the primary inspiration for the estate-style homes that have existed in the area and for the new estate homes recently built or proposed.  Field surveys and aerial photographs have confirmed the environmental conditions prevalent within the northern 40 acres of this area and statements from property owners within the area have confirmed the desirability of preserving this environment. 

The southern 19 acres (four parcels) have a substantially different topography and environment than the northern 40 acres.  These four parcels are relatively flat, and existing trees are limited to the periphery of the parcels.  The flat, open areas on these parcels have been maintained by homeowners as yard areas.  There are three homes on the property all of which are quality homes but may be undervalued compared to the underlying land values. 

Public Utilities and Infrastructure

The entire 59- acre area is currently not serviced by public water or sanitary sewer.  Upon annexation into the Village of Burr Ridge, all of the properties should be able to access the Village’s public water supply system.  There are currently water mains on German Church Road and County Line Road.  These water mains are subject to recapture fees, but there do not appear to be any physical limitations to providing water service to this area. 

Public sanitary sewer service is inherently more difficult to provide than public water.  Although there are sanitary sewer service lines on County Line Road at Deer Path Trail and at Hidden Lake Drive, those services are provided by the DuPage County Public Works Department, and the subject area is within the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District.  Recent correspondence from both agencies has indicated that it may be possible to connect the County Line Road parcels to the DuPage County sanitary sewer.  The east half of the subject 59 acres may be serviced by a sanitary sewer stub located at the west edge of the adjacent Arrowhead Farm Subdivision.  Alternately, the Village of Burr Ridge Zoning Ordinance permits requests for private sanitary sewer systems for properties equal to or exceeding one acre and 150 feet wide subject to Village Board approval upon showing that access to a public sewer is not practical and a commitment is provided to connect to public sewer within six months after it becomes available. 

In summary, it appears that public utilities may be accessible for this area.  Private sanitary sewer systems may be an option if public sewers are not available and lots remain at or above one acre and 150 feet in width. 

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Surrounding Zoning and Development

Surrounding zoning of the 59-acre area is entirely single-family residential but varies from the R-1 District with a minimum lot size of five acres to the R-3 District with a minimum lot size of approximately ½ acre.   Other than German Church Road and County Line Road, there are no street connections between the 59 acres and the surrounding subdivisions.  The surrounding residential zoning clearly dictates that the 59 acres remain single-family residential.  However, the variety of zoning in the surrounding area, the lack of direct connections between the 59 acres and the surrounding subdivisions, and the size of the area permits consideration of any of the various Burr Ridge zoning districts.  In other words, the 59-acre area which is the subject of this Plan amendment is relatively self contained.  As long as it is developed with single-family homes consistent in quality with other Burr Ridge homes, development of this area will not have an adverse impact on existing subdivisions or homes in the immediate area. 

Recommendations for Future Zoning and Development

As noted above, the most significant condition of this area relative to future land use and development are the existing environmental conditions on the northern 40 acres (eight parcels).  This area contains significant woodlands, topography, and wildlife.  Preservation of such environmental conditions has already been established as a goal of the Village via the 1999 Comprehensive Plan (see Section 4.3).  The primary goal of this amendment to the Comprehensive Plan is to provide a mechanism for preserving the existing environmental conditions within the north 40 acres of this 59-acre area.  Therefore, the following conclusions and recommendations are provided: 

  • The R-2 Single-Family Residence District should be utilized for the north 40 acres (eight parcels) of the subject area.  The R-2 District permits low density development of approximately two units per five acres.  The low density of the R-2 District reduces the environmental impacts from the construction of homes, accessory structures, utilities, and stormwater management facilities -- all of which contributes to the Plan’s desire to preserve existing environmental conditions.
  • The subject R-2 District should be accessed via rural cross-section streets consistent with the regulations of the Village of Burr Ridge Subdivision Ordinance.  Rural cross-section streets are more narrow than traditional suburban streets and do not include curbs, gutters, or underground storm sewers.  Thus, the R-2 District with its allowance of rural cross-section streets substantially contributes to the goal of preserving the existing environmental conditions.  The recommended rural streets may be private if deemed appropriate by the Village.
  • The Village should consider measures that would allow the existing properties, all of which are 4.5 to 5 acres in area, to be divided into two parcels.  This action would be intended to dissipate some of the development pressure currently placed on this area by the real estate market while still allowing property owners to obtain an increased value for their properties.  Measures to allow the split of these properties may include allowance of private street easements in lieu of dedicated right-of-way or relief from the R-2 District lot size requirements.
  • Street access to the R-2 District should be limited to the existing private streets that service the east half of the proposed R-2 District.  If any of the properties are split into two parcels, the existing private streets servicing those parcels should be improved to provide adequate access for emergency and service vehicles.
  • The south 19 acres (four parcels) may be considered for future subdivision development most preferably under the R-2A District standards.  The preferred development of this area would be a consolidation of the four parcels into one development tract.
  • Access to the southern parcels should be via a fully improved and dedicated suburban cross- section street with curbs, gutters, and storm sewers as required by the Burr Ridge Subdivision Ordinance.   Access from County Line Road should be limited to a single street located in compliance with the Subdivision Ordinance.

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Implementation

The entire 59-acre area is expected to be annexed by the Village in the near future at which time it will automatically be placed within the Village’s R-1 Single-family Residence District as per Illinois State Statutes.  The Village may choose to initiate a rezoning of the entire area consistent with the recommendations of this Plan amendment or may choose to allow the property to remain within the R-1 District until such time that individual property owners approach the Village with the desire to rezone or subdivide their property.  Consideration of relief to allow properties within the recommended R-2 District to split their properties may also be considered as a whole or as individual properties approach the Village for rezoning or lot division.

6. COMMUNITY DESIGN

Burr Ridge currently lacks a strong sense of “community” due, in part, to the preponderance of overlapping jurisdictional boundaries of the government units that service the Village. Because Burr Ridge has not actively sought to annex property into the Village, it has grown with very irregular municipal boundaries that make easy identification of the Village limits difficult. The Community Design chapter of the Comprehensive Plan seeks to establish a distinctive visual character for the Village’s major gateways and transportation corridors. This is to be achieved by the following policies, as articulated in the Goals and Objectives section of the Comprehensive Plan:

  • Landscape and develop the County Line Road and Frontage Road intersections, north and south of the Route I-55 interchange, the South Frontage Road and 91st Street right-of-way intersections with Robert Kingery Highway, and the Madison Street and Plainfield Road intersection as gateways to the community. Establish signage to identify other main entrance points into Burr Ridge.
  • Encourage individual subdivisions to design their entryway signs to include common features from the Village’s entrance signage, in order to unify and identify the subdivisions as being part of Burr Ridge.
  • Landscape the Frontage Roads to define and enhance their connections with County Line Road and buffer Interstate Route I-55.
  • Enhance the appearance of arterial streets within Burr Ridge.
  • Preserve the existing estate-type character of County Line Road in accordance with the County Line Road Overlay District, as amended through March, 1995.
  • Develop a continuous natural open space area along the Des Plaines River to define the southern edge of the Burr Ridge planning area.
  • Encourage tree planting on public and private property to enhance the wooded character of Burr Ridge.
  • Encourage burial of utility lines. 

6.1       Subdivision Entryways

Burr Ridge has grown as a collection of subdivisions that maintain their own individual identities. While individuality is an important aspect of the community’s identity, many residents also want to establish a common Burr Ridge identity. One way to do this would be to encourage individual subdivisions to adopt a common unifying theme or common materials in their entryway signs. Unifying elements should build upon the gateway features used to identify the main entrances to Burr Ridge. Subdivision signs should include the words “Burr Ridge” in smaller font next to the subdivision name. 

Consideration should be given to amending the Subdivision Ordinance to implement this recommendation by establishing a palette of materials or other common elements that must be incorporated into subdivision entrance signage. Older subdivisions could be encouraged to adopt such unifying elements as old entry signs are replaced. A more proactive approach would be to establish a funding program where the Village would pay a portion of the cost of replacing existing subdivision signs if they adopted the common elements in their design. 

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6.2    Gateways

Two types of gateway features are recommended. The principal gateways define the main entrances to the Village, which help to establish a sense of place for the Village. Principal gateways are generally located where major streets, carrying significant amounts of traffic, enter the community. The secondary gateways define the boundaries of the Village and differentiate Burr Ridge from its neighbors. These have been located at key intersections that define either the current municipal boundaries or the logical extent of Burr Ridge’s planning area. Recommended gateway locations are shown in Figure 9: Proposed Gateway Locations

One of the short-term issues that will affect the Village’s ability to undertake gateway improvements is that many of the recommended gateway locations are not currently within the Village boundaries. Consequently, the design guidelines are intended to illustrate gateway concepts rather than specific design solutions. 

Principal Gateways

The Plan proposes to create strong principal gateways in several locations, as shown in Figure 9. The gateway design should project a common image and theme. At the same time, it is important to respond to existing site conditions at each gateway location. The important features and issues that should be considered for each gateway design are discussed below. 

The design for the principal gateways could consist of a combination of signage and landscape treatment. The signage should be rustic in appearance in order to reflect the desired rural character of Burr Ridge. The signs could consist of naturally exposed wood with a two post construction. The landscape material should be native to the area and consist of a mixture of shrubs and perennials with a variety of color and blooming trees. A combination of evergreen and deciduous trees could be used. Burr Oak tree groupings could be used for the principal gateways, given the use of the oak leaf as the Village emblem. Other landscape elements could include large field rocks interspersed amongst the landscaping. A rock wall with appropriate signage, could be constructed where there is adequate space and topography.  There should be a variation in the height and treatment of the rock wall to add to the wall’s prominence and visual appeal. 

The locations of the principal gateways are as follows: 

a)   North and South Frontage Road and County Line Road intersections.

The I-55 and County Line Road interchange serves as the major entranceway to the Village. County Line Road also provides access to North and South Frontage Roads that serve the light industrial and commercial core of Burr Ridge. These areas are frequent destinations for workers and residents. The proposed gateway should serve the dual function of defining the entrance to the Village as well as the entrances of Frontage Road. The Plan, therefore, recommends establishing primary gateways at: 

i)    The intersections of Burr Ridge Parkway and County Line Road, south of Route I-55.

The main civic and commercial uses are clustered around this intersection. Specifically, Village Hall and several professional offices are located to the west, and Corporate Parkand County Line Square are located to the east of this intersection. Most of these uses are accessed from the Frontage Roads which branch off from County Line Road. Currently, the entrances to the Frontage Roads are not well defined and confusing. 

There is sufficient land adjacent to this intersection to establish gateway features. One possible location is on the southeast corner in the area adjacent to the detention basin that serves County Line Square. The detention basin has been identified as an important public space for the proposed redevelopment concept for County Line Square. A gateway element on this corner could emphasize the presence of a revitalized and enhanced commercial center.  

Another potential location on the southwest corner is the grassy area just north of the Village Hall. This site is particularly appropriate because it is already publicly-owned and could be readily improved as a community gateway. The design could include a mix of signage and landscape elements as shown in Figure 10: Principal Gateway Improvement Concept. Given the proximity of the Village Hall, the southwest corner should include a community sign with information regarding Governor’s Home Town award and other community honors. 

ii)   The intersection of Case Drive and County Line Road, north of Route I-55.

The gateway proposed at this intersection would define the north entrance into the Village. Light industrial and residential uses are located adjacent to this intersection and are accessed by North Frontage Road. Grassy strips located on the east and west of the intersection, similar to the Burr Ridge Parkway intersection, would be appropriate locations for the gateway elements. The gateway design for this intersection should also clearly identify the entrance to North Frontage Road. Consideration should also be given to replacing the existing concrete median with a landscaped median similar, to the median treatment south of I-55. 

iii)  The I-55 Interchange.

The I-55 interchange could be enhanced through landscape improvements to visually improve the entrance into Burr Ridge. This could be achieved by planting prairie style landscaping within the loops of the interchange. Prairie landscapes typically require very low maintenance and would be ideal for the interchange location. The Village should also work with the Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT) to identify acceptable options for screening the fences with landscaping or replacing the existing fences with a more attractive alternative. 

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b)   Robert Kingery Highway and South Frontage Road

The intersection of Robert Kingery Highway and South Frontage Road represents an important entrance into the community from the west. Currently, a mix of commercial uses, including a gas station, are located east of the intersection. The existing Burr Ridge identification sign is not immediately visible from Robert Kingery Highway and there is no clear indication that there is access into Burr Ridge or to South Frontage Road from this intersection.  The grassy berm on the northeast corner of this intersection might be an appropriate location for the gateway feature. The gateway element should include signage clearly indicating the entrance to the community and South Frontage Road. 

c)   East side of Robert Kingery Highway at 91st Street

The Robert Kingery Highway and 91st Street intersection represents another long-term opportunity to define a gateway to Burr Ridge. Robert Kingery Highway (Route 83) is a major regional arterial and defines the western limits of Burr Ridge’s planning area. Since this intersection and the surrounding area are not currently within the Village boundaries, development of a specific gateway treatment will have to wait until the area is annexed to the Village of Burr Ridge. The design of the gateway feature should clearly indicate the location of Burr Ridge to the east of Robert Kingery Highway. 

d)   Madison Street and Plainfield Road intersection

The southeast corner of Madison Street and Plainfield Road intersection represents an excellent opportunity to establish a principal gateway to Burr Ridge. The Planned Unit Development for the High Grove business park includes a provision for a prominent design feature at this location. Given the high quality buildings being built in the High Grove development, a Burr Ridge gateway sign would clearly announce then entry into an upscale community. 

The gateway enhancement of the expressway interchanges and County Line Road intersections would have to be established in cooperation with Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT) and Cook County, which have jurisdictional authority over them. The Village should also explore opportunities to jointly fund the proposed gateway improvements with IDOT. The proposed Village Hall gateway improvement could be undertaken as funds become available. 

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Secondary Gateways

Secondary gateways could include a landscaped sign identifying the Village of Burr Ridge.  The Village already has several existing signs serving this purpose. These signs have a rustic design appropriate to the rural character of Burr Ridge. Landscaping to enhance these signs is recommended, as illustrated in Figure 11:  Secondary Gateway Illustrative Concept

Existing identification signs are located at the following locations. These should be enhanced with the proposed landscape improvements.  

a)     Intersection of County Line Road and 60th Street

b)     Intersection of 91st Street and Garfield Avenue (The existing signage at this intersection identifies the location of Rustic Acres, which houses the municipal offices.)

c)     Wolf Road and 79th Street

d)     German-Church Road, east of Arrowhead Farm

Additional secondary gateway signs should be located at the following locations: 

a)     Intersection of Interstate Route 294 overpass and Plainfield Road.

b)     Intersection of 91st Street and County Line Road.

c)     Intersection of 91st street and the proposed bike trail along Flag Creek. (This location is also presently outside of the Village of Burr Ridge, but is within its planning area.) 

The secondary signs would be most effectively implemented through a capital improvements program using general funds from normal Village revenue sources. Several of these gateway improvements cannot be scheduled until the proposed locations become part of Burr Ridge.

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6.3 Streetscape Enhancement

Streetscape enhancements should build upon the Village’s desire for a rural character along the continuous streets that define the main edges of the community. While over time there may be additional streets that merit streetscape enhancement, initially, this effort should address the Frontage Roads, Madison Street and County Line Road. 

Frontage Roads

The North and South Frontage Roads can be characterized as predominantly light industrial and office access routes.  The two lane Frontage Roads are accessed from County Line Road and run parallel to it before curving along the highway interchanges to run parallel to Interstate Route I-55. North and South Frontage Road present most travelers along Interstate Route I-55 with their only vision of Burr Ridge. 

Landscape improvement along the Frontage Roads should be consistent with their character and function as an industrial/commercial access route. Additionally, landscape improvements should buffer the adjoining uses from Interstate Route I-55.  A system of signage should be established to better identify the access to the Frontage Roads.  

The location and configuration of the Frontage Roads pose significant challenges in developing and maintaining landscape treatments. The proximity of the expressway, and the existing narrow planting bed, limits the type and extent of landscaping. Landscape improvements must be sensitive to traffic safety and associated considerations. 

The Frontage Roads, with the exception of Bridewell Drive located within the Corporate Park, are owned by IDOT. Recent improvements to Bridewell Drive, including road widening, curb and gutters, were fully funded by IDOT and Cook County on the understanding that Burr Ridge would be responsible for future maintenance. The Village should negotiate with IDOT for similar improvements on other Frontage Roads in order to establish the proposed streetscape improvements. 

Madison Street

The character of Madison Street changes from residential to commercial along distinct sections of the road. From just south of 83rd Street to Plainfield Road, Madison Street serves as a primary commercial route, providing access to several industrial parks and other commercial uses. Between 79th Street and 83rd Street, Madison Street serves as the dividing line between industrial uses to the west and residential neighborhoods to the east. South of 83rd Street, the development pattern changes to residential. 

Along the residential portions of Madison Streets, streetscape enhancements should emphasize the naturalistic character of the residential environment. In areas where industrial and residential uses meet, streetscape improvements should provide an attractive buffer or transition between these uses. Streetscape improvements along the commercial portions of Madison Street should address parking concerns and curb cut requirements for the various businesses. 

Madison Street is also significant, because it is the only realistic pedestrian and bicycle pathway link between the northern and southern halves of Burr Ridge. Thus, streetscape improvements should also serve to enhance the travel experience for bicyclists and pedestrians. 

The streetscape enhancements along Madison Street can be incrementally implemented. However, an overall concept plan should be adopted in order to develop a cohesive streetscape. It should be noted that Madison Street has also been identified as a primary pathway route. Therefore, the streetscape improvements should be coordinated with the development of the proposed pathway system. The Pathway Plan is discussed in greater detail in the Transportation and Circulation chapter of the Comprehensive Plan. The proposed landscape improvements could be established as a part of a Village capital improvements program. Improvements located adjacent to vacant parcels could be required as a part of the subdivision and approval process. Finally, the Village of Burr Ridge could work with the Village of Willowbrook in jointly developing improvements along shared sections of Madison Street. 

County Line Road

County Line Road extends north to south through the Village of Burr Ridge and its planning area. It is the main entrance to Burr Ridge and its primary focal point. County Line Road is subject to the provisions of the County Line Road Overlay District, as amended through March, 1995. These regulations are designed to protect the estate-type setting that exists along much of the County Line Road corridor. Minimum residential lot sizes of 40,000 square feet are required along County Line Road with front yard setbacks of 80 feet, except where an approved landscape plan is in effect. In this circumstance, the front yard setback can be reduced to 60 feet. These requirements are designed to help achieve open, uncrowded residential development in harmony with existing large lot uses. 

Most of the County Line Road corridor is fully developed and no immediate streetscape improvements are recommended, with the exception of the gateway enhancements discussed earlier in this chapter. As part of the gateway enhancement effort, consideration should be given to replacement of the concrete median north of Interstate Route I-55 with a landscaped median.  

Cook County is scheduled to undertake a major road improvement project between 79th Street and 91st Street, but County Line Road will remain a two lane street. Concurrent with these improvements, the Village is considering a pathway extension. When these improvements are completed, consideration should be given to naturalistic landscape improvements that would further enhance the rural character of the corridor. Any County Line Road streetscape enhancements should reflect the overall objectives of the County Line Road Overlay District, as amended through March, 1995.

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7. TRANSPORTATION AND CIRCULATION

Burr Ridge is served by both a local and regional roadway network which allows easy access into and out of the community. This network is supplemented by two Pace bus routes providing limited commuter service. Certain parts of the Village are also served by pathways that are geared to the needs of pedestrians and bicycle riders. 

7.1 Street System

The main transportation goals are as follows: 

  • Maintain and develop roads, streets and highways in proper scale with their intended uses and adjacent land uses, to ensure that they can safely handle present and anticipated traffic volumes.
  • Encourage non-residential land uses that enhance the Village tax base yet attract minimal non-local traffic.
  • Provide for through vehicular traffic on major arterials with minimum inconvenience to residents.
  • Promote development of low volume residential roadways to maintain privacy and tranquil environment.
  • Provide street extensions and connections between residential neighborhoods, as appropriate, to improve circulation within the Village.

The Burr Ridge street system consists of highways, arterials, collectors and local roads. Highways carry large volumes of traffic between Burr Ridge and other parts of the region.  I-55 and I-294 are classified as highways.  Arterials carry traffic across and beyond the Village and include Route 83, County Line Road, Plainfield Road, Madison Street, 55th Street and Wolf Road. Collectors provide circulation between arterials and local roads. Burr Ridge collectors include 91st Street, German Church Road, and 79th Street. Finally, local streets provide access to neighborhoods and individual properties. They comprise the remainder of the roadway system in the Village. The street system plan is shown in Figure 12:  Street System Plan

The Burr Ridge street system includes a mix of public and private streets. The Burr Ridge Public Works Department is responsible for maintenance of approximately 70 miles of local streets and 75 cul-de-sacs. However, the Village’s ability to upgrade and improve certain major arterials including County Line Road and Plainfield Road is limited because they are under county jurisdiction. Improvements are governed by the jurisdiction that owns and maintains the road, which can be either a private individual, groups of individuals, Village, County or the State of Illinois.  The Village, therefore, cannot always determine, or even influence the nature or timing of roadway improvements.  

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Residential Circulation System Improvements

Street connections and extensions should be provided, where appropriate, in order to improve residential circulation within the Village. The purpose of these street connections should be to improve connections between residential neighborhoods and not to encourage cut through traffic within the neighborhoods. Several areas where residential street connections may be appropriate are described below. Examples of how these proposals might be achieved are shown in Figure 13: Residential Circulation System Improvement Concept Plan. Additional street connections should be pursued as opportunities arise and as unincorporated areas are annexed into Burr Ridge. 

New street connections for the Tri-State residential neighborhood, currently outside the Village of Burr Ridge limits, are recommended. At the time of annexation, 89th Street should be extended to link it with Skyline Drive, in order to connect the Tri-State neighborhood with the Village’s street system. Concurrently, Hillside Drive and Valley View Drive should be disconnected from Robert Kingery Highway. Robert Kingery Highway is a high traffic volume roadway, and the current access conditions to the subject neighborhood pose safety hazards. The proposed street connections would result in improved circulation and safer access conditions to the residential neighborhood. Furthermore, Skyline Drive should be extended to link with Circle Avenue, in order to connect the Tri State neighborhood with the neighborhood directly to the north. 

Street extensions should also be considered for the Madison Club subdivision, located at the northwest corner of 87th Street and Madison Street. On annexation, Thurlow Street could be extended north to connect with this neighborhood. 

The proposed street connections can be established incrementally as areas are developed, redeveloped or annexed. Street connections in undeveloped areas within the Village can be a required improvement as part of the Development Approval and Subdivision process. Similarly, as the Village annexes the unincorporated sections of the planning area, specific street connections could be required as a part of the annexation agreement or as part of a Village-sponsored capital improvement program. A more proactive approach might be required for establishing street interconnections within the existing neighborhoods in the Village. This could be achieved through a long range capital improvement program or by taking advantage of development opportunities as they arise.  

The Village should also coordinate with adjacent communities or other governmental units having common interests and goals in order to take advantage of opportunities to construct street connections. For example, DuPage County plans to build a sewer line between 79th Street and 81st Street east of Garfield Avenue, providing the opportunity to create a roadway link between 79th Street and 81st Street, along Laura Lee Lane. A site development concept plan for 79th Street, between 81st Street and Laura Lee Lane is shown in Figure 14: 79th Street/Laura Lee Lane Development Concept that illustrates how Burr Ridge could take advantage of opportunities to connect residential land to the existing circulation system.  

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7.2    Pathway Plan

Burr Ridge currently possesses a loose network of on-road trails and sidewalks but lacks an overall coherent system of pedestrian and bicycle pathways. This Plan articulates two major goals regarding the pathway system within the Village, which are as follows:

  • Establish and maintain a pedestrian and bicycle system in the Village, which connects the neighborhoods to community facilities such as parks, schools, shopping centers and community centers.
  • Encourage the connection of residential growth areas to the existing Burr Ridge circulation system. 

A Pathway Plan has been developed to address these goals. It includes recommendations regarding both short and long term improvements. The main objectives of the pathway plan are to service local residents and strengthen the sense of community by connecting neighborhoods to local destinations such as parks, schools, shopping centers and community centers. The pathway system should be integrated with pathway systems in the neighboring municipalities and to regional systems provided by Cook and DuPage Counties. The Plan has been structured to allow the Village to develop the path system incrementally over the years as development opportunities and funding become available. The Plan also provides alternative methods to safely separate pedestrians and bicyclists from vehicular traffic. 

The Pathway Plan, shown in Figure 15: Pathway Plan, proposes a series of continuous routes for both the north and south sectors of Burr Ridge. The plan is structured as a system of primary and secondary pathways and consists of four north-south routes and three east-west routes.  

The primary north-south routes include Madison Street, County Line Road, between 79th and 91st Street, Wolf Road and the proposed Flagg Creek bike trail. Madison Street has been identified as the only feasible continuous north-south primary route. Madison Street functions as a major arterial and provides access to adjacent light industrial and office uses, and community facilities like Harvester Park, Kraml Park and Gower Middle school. A pathway along Madison Street would provide a connection between the north and south sections of the Village, in order to link the park facilities located in these two sections of the Village, as well provide access to schools and retail facilities located in County Line Square. 

A continuous pathway along Madison Street would probably be established on an incremental basis. An advantage of designating Madison Street as a primary route is that there is an existing sidewalk along most of the street sections located within the Village boundaries. The only section of incorporated Madison Street without a sidewalk is between 91st Street and Provencal Drive. This remaining section should be improved with a sidewalk on a priority basis. Sections of Madison Street that are outside of the Village limits, but within the planning area, should be improved with a pathway upon annexation. These pathways could be established as part of an annexation agreement and would typically entail longer term planning. 

County Line Road has not been identified as a continuous north-south pathway route, even though it is the major north-south vehicular traffic arterial for the Village. This is primarily because the closely spaced on and off ramps to Interstate Route 55 pose a major safety hazard for pedestrians and bicyclists attempting to cross over the Interstate Route 55 interchange. However, County Line Road should be developed with a pathway system between Burr Ridge Parkway and 91st Street. This would serve to connect the two main east-west pathway routes on 79th and 91st Street, thereby improving access to the Corporate Park facilities and Village Hall. 

The Plan also recommends developing a bike trail along the Northern Utility Gas Company right-of-way and Flagg Creek, between 91st Street and Interstate Route I-55. The Flagg Creek trail provides an ideal opportunity to establish a consolidated pedestrian and bike trail network in a natural setting, along the periphery of the Village. This trail should eventually be connected to the existing regional Illinois and Michigan Canal trail, in order to take full advantage of the existing recreational opportunities in that area. A potential point of connection could be along the Robert Kingery Highway. 

The three primary east-west pathways include Plainfield Road on the north, 79th Street in the center, and 91st Street on the south. A sidewalk has already been established along significant sections of Plainfield Road and 91st Street, and along the entire length of 79th Street. The 91st sidewalk should be extended to connect with Anne M. Jeans School and the existing pathway leading to Waterfall Glenn Forest Preserve, located west of the planning area. This would allow residents to take advantage of the existing recreational resources in the area. 

The proposed system of primary routes divides the Village into several sub-neighborhoods. The secondary pathway routes should be planned off of these primary routes and should link important community facilities such as parks and schools, as well as connect different neighborhoods. The Plan identifies a basic framework of secondary routes. The intent of the secondary routes is to establish a system of grids that provide continuous linkages between most of the neighborhoods and Village community facilities. Such a system would not only provide pedestrian/bicycle access to the various community facilities, but also strengthen a sense of community among residents. Additional secondary routes should be developed in the future based on unique site considerations, future development opportunities and availability of funding. Wherever possible, pathway planning should take advantage of existing sidewalks, or potential connectors in the vicinity. 

An existing secondary pathway system is largely lacking, especially in the section south of 79th Street. The proposed pathways in the southeast section of Burr Ridge could be established during the development of the German Church Road subarea. The Plan proposes an extensive network of secondary pathways in the southwest section of the Village linking several neighborhood parks. Since the residential streets have very low volumes of traffic, most of these pathways could be developed as a shared use roadway. 

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Design Standards and Intersection Improvements

A well designed cohesive landscape adds to the visual experience of the pathways, improves the streetscape and attracts a greater number of users to the path system.  Functionally, it serves as a buffer between the vehicular and bicycle traffic. However, landscape material should not create visual hazards for motorists or path users.  Hence, plants over three feet tall should be avoided within 50 feet of intersections and driveways. Landscape improvements for the Flag Creek bike path should be minimal and designed to compliment and enhance existing natural features, especially the wooded areas and creeks. Improvements should also be coordinated with the streetscape recommendations for specific streets and intersections, included in the Community Design chapter of the Comprehensive Plan. 

Intersections, where the path users must cross streets carrying vehicular traffic, should be identified a considerable distance in advance. This can be accomplished by appropriate traffic control signs such as warning and stop signs. Pavement markings to identify the crossing should also be considered at major intersections. 

Implementation Strategies

The Village could adopt a combination of proactive and incremental approaches for implementing the proposed pathway plan. A proactive approach would involve utilizing general funds from normal Village revenue sources such as the sidewalk fund and applying for outside government grants. A more incremental approach would include implementation through the development approval and subdivision process, annexation agreements and coordination with other tax districts and neighboring communities with common concerns and responsibilities. 

To initiate development of the system, the Village should consider proactively funding strategic portions of the pathway system through general fund revenues or the capital improvement budgeting process. The existing sidewalk fund could also be used for this purpose. Currently, developers are required to escrow funds in lieu of construction of certain sidewalks required by the Village. A Pathway Commission has been established to manage and review this process.  

The primary pathway network along existing streets includes Madison Street, County Line Road between Burr Ridge parkway and 91st Street, Plainfield Road, Wolf Road, 79th Street and 91st Street. The development of the missing pathway sections along these primary arterials should be prioritized. An appropriate use of general revenue funds would be for signage improvements and completion of the missing segments of the primary pathway network. The Village could also use these funds to establish secondary pathways within the already developed neighborhoods. Additional funding could be generated by coordinating with other tax districts with similar interests, such as the park and school district, to link community facilities with residential neighborhoods. 

However, major elements of the pathway plan involving construction of pathways on right-of-ways not currently owned by the Village and may require use of external funds in form of grants from state and federal government or special funds set aside by the Village. In the past, grants for bikeway construction have been made available from the Federal Highway Administration, administered by the Illinois Department of Highways. Similarly, pathway improvement in public parks could be funded through the Land and Water Conservation Grants, a federal program administered by the Illinois Department of Conservation. The Village could also consider annexation agreements as a method of requiring pathways within certain areas. 

The subdivision and development process may also be used to establish parts of the pathway system. For instance, large planned unit developments or large non-residential developments should be encouraged to include pathways as part of their development or improvement plans. 

Finally, the Village should initiate discussions with local school and park districts as well as the neighboring Villages of Willow Springs and Willowbrook to identify means of area wide cooperation in the implementation of the proposed path plan. Many of these districts might be interested in the development of a path system, and joint funding of certain segments of the pathway system would help spread the cost across several taxing bodies. For instance, the bike path proposed along Flagg Creek could be developed incrementally, in conjunction with the park district and Village of Willow Springs. Similarly, the Village of Willowbrook might be interested in jointly developing shared pathways along Madison Street, that can be utilized by residents of both Villages.

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7.3       Public Transportation

Pace provides limited bus service for Burr Ridge commuters. A Park-n-Ride lot is located in the Burr Ridge Corporate Park just east of County Line Square. The Park-n-Ride facility includes a shelter and space for 88 cars. The Route 668 Pace bus provides service to the Hinsdale Metra station with additional stops at 79th and Garfield, County Line Road and Carriage Place, and Garfield and Plainfield. The Route 855 “I-55 Flyer” to Chicago’s Loop makes morning and evening stops at the Park-n-Ride lot.  This bus service should be maintained for the convenience of Burr Ridge residents and commuters to the Corporate Park.

8. COMMUNITY FACILITIES AND SERVICES

Community facilities are illustrated in Figure 16: Community Facilities Map, which shows the locations of schools, parks, and public institutions that provide a variety of services enjoyed by Burr Ridge residents. One of the issues facing Burr Ridge in establishing a clear community identity is the preponderance of overlapping tax districts of the various governmental units and utilities that provide services to residents of Burr Ridge and its planning jurisdiction. Specifically, the Village and its planning area are served by two fire districts, four elementary school districts, two high school districts and three park districts. Only a portion of the Village is located within an existing library district. These numerous jurisdictional districts significantly limit a “sense of community” as it precludes a common sharing of institutional resources. However, there are also opportunities to build upon elements that create a strong community image. These include exploring the potential for locating a new library facility and community activity centers that serve all residents of the Village. Other options are addressed in the Community Design Chapter and Subarea Plans chapter of the Comprehensive Plan. 

Community facilities that serve all Burr Ridge residents should be encouraged. The main goals and policies for the provision of community facilities are as follows: 

  • Maintain existing, and encourage additional, recreational facilities that serve residents of all age groups.
  • Encourage park districts to provide each neighborhood of the Village with open space and neighborhood parks.
  • Improve access to existing park facilities through more effective coordination between local park districts.
  • Consider providing a community house or some other common facility available to all residents, preferably with a central location in the Burr Ridge Corporate Park.
  • Explore the potential for providing Village library services to serve all Burr Ridge residents, preferably located in the Burr Ridge Corporate Park.
  • Encourage residents to convert from individual wells and septic systems to Village water and sanitary sewer systems.
  • Encourage the routine maintenance of privately-owned detention ponds to insure that storm water detention capacity is adequate, in order to minimize flooding. 

8.1    Police Protection

Burr Ridge maintains its own police department which operates under the 911 emergency system.  Currently, the police department has three divisions:  Administrative Division, Detective Division and the Patrol Division, which includes foot patrol, bicycle patrol and vehicular patrol. Their dispatching services and computer record system are provided through the Darien Area Dispatch Center, which is a regional center that manages calls for Burr Ridge, Darien and Lisle. The Burr Ridge Police Department is committed to a community oriented approach to policing and emphasizes residential patrol and foot patrol in commercial areas. The department also maintains other programs such as the crime prevention program which includes home and business security surveys, basic self-defense for woman, neighborhood watch program, street gang awareness and project DARE. On an average, Burr Ridge police officers respond to approximately 7,000 calls for service each year, with a majority of these calls attributed to criminal activity including property crimes, disturbance calls, and traffic accidents. The existing public safety facilities appear to be adequate to address future needs as additional portions of the planning area are annexed into Burr Ridge. 

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8.2    Fire Protection

Burr Ridge is serviced by two different fire departments - the Tri-State Fire Protection District and the Pleasantview Fire Protection District. The Tri-State Fire Protection District has a service area of approximately 18.5 square miles and serves the portion of Burr Ridge generally west of County Line Road and south of Plainfield Road, and includes the Villages of Willowbrook, Darien, Burr Ridge and unincorporated DuPage County. The Pleasantview Fire Protection District has a service area of 15 square miles and serves those areas of the Village which are not covered by the Tri-State Fire Protection District and includes portions of Burr Ridge, Willow Springs and unincorporated Cook County.  

Difficult access conditions to certain developments are of concern to both fire districts. Numerous subdivisions in Burr Ridge provide only a single access which can increase response time for the fire departments. Additionally, overgrown trees around the entrances and driveways of numerous properties make access very difficult, if not impossible. 

Both fire districts provide excellent coverage to all of their respective service areas.  The existing facilities appear to be adequate to service future developments and additional capital improvements are not envisioned. 

8.3    School Districts

Burr Ridge residents are served by four different elementary school districts and two high school districts. The entire community is served by the College of DuPage. There are four elementary schools located within the Burr Ridge corporate limits. None of the high school campuses are located in Burr Ridge.  

In addition to the public schools listed below, many Burr Ridge children attend private and parochial schools in the area including: Our Lady of Peace, St. Isaac Jogues, St. John of the Cross, and Trinity Lutheran. 

Additional educational facilities are not expected to be required for the Burr Ridge planning area, given the low residential density and adequate existing facilities within the Village.

TABLE 12: SCHOOL DISTRICTS

District School Name & Location
Grades Served
Total Students
Hinsdale District 181 Elm School, Burr Ridge
K-5
397
Hinsdale Middle School, Hinsdale
6-8
1047
Gower District 62 Gower West, Willowbrook
K-4
455
Gower Middle School, Burr Ridge
5-8
441
District 180 Anne M. Jeans, Hinsdale
K-5
421
Burr Ridge Middle School, Burr Ridge
6-8
333
Pleasantdale District 107 Pleasantdale South, LaGrange
K-4
364
Pleasantdale North, Burr Ridge
5-8
300
Hinsdale District 86 Hinsdale Central High School, Hinsdale
9-12
2,103
Hinsdale South High School, Darien
9-12
1,627
Lyons Township District 204 Lyons Township South, LaGrange
9-10
1,552
Lyons Township North, LaGrange
11-12
1,543

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8.4    Parks and Recreation

Parks and recreation facilities provide areas for recreation and leisure, and they serve as gathering sites for community and neighborhood fairs, parties, and other special events.  These areas also act as buffers from different intensities of uses as well as contribute to a community’s character and quality of life. 

Burr Ridge residents are served by two separate park districts, the Burr Ridge Park District and the Pleasant Dale Park District. In addition, the Tri-State Park District serves a portion of Burr Ridge’s planning area located between Madison Street and Route 83. 

The Burr Ridge Park District boundaries include the areas south of 59th Street down to the Atchison Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad between Madison Street and County Line Road. The Burr Ridge Park District also includes an area located east of County Line Road and north of I-55. The Pleasant Dale Park District serves the remaining portions of Burr Ridge east of County Line Road.  Funding for these districts is through a mix of local taxes and user fees.  During the last several years, the revenues collected from the taxes have increased, but in the coming years, the districts expect to have to rely more on revenues generated from user fees to increase the number of parks within each district. 

The Burr Ridge Park District owns and maintains 10 parks including Garywood Park, McCullough Park, Harvester Park, Oak Grove Park, Whitaker Park, Lake Ridge Club Park, Park Center, Stevens Park, Kraml Park and Palisades Park and a community swimming pool (Woods Pool). In addition, the Burr Ridge Park District operates programs under lease arrangements at the following facilities owned by other units of government:  Elm School, Knollwood Boat Launch, Rustic Acres, Gower Middle School, Gower West School, Burr Ridge Middle School, Anne M. Jeans School, Hinsdale South High School, and the Tri-State Park District’s Sunshine Park. 

The Pleasant Dale Park District operates five parks. These include Walker Park, Lake Carriage Way Park, Soehrman Park, White Buffalo Park and Flagg Creek Golf Course. Only Walker Park and Lake Carriage Way Park are located within the Burr Ridge municipal boundaries. 

TABLE 13: EXISTING PARK INVENTORY

  Acres
Inside Village Boundary
Type of Facility
Pleasant Dale Park District 125.0    
Walker Park 44.0 Yes Community
Flagg Creek Golf Course 62.0 No Community
White Buffalo Park 4.0 No Neighborhood
Soehrman Park 6.0 No Neighborhood/Community
Lake Carriage Way Park 9.0 Yes Neighborhood/Community
Burr Ridge Park District 72.8    
Garywood 1.5 Yes Neighborhood
Harvester 37.0 Yes Community
Kraml 2.5 Yes Neighborhood
Lake Ridge 1.9 Yes Neighborhood
McCullough 9.0 Yes Neighborhood
Oak Grove 3.0 Yes Neighborhood
Palisades 7.4 Yes Neighborhood/Community
Park 3.5 Yes Neighborhood
Stevens 1.5 Yes Neighborhood
Whitaker 3.0 Yes Neighborhood
Woods 2.5 Yes Neighborhood/Community
Tri-State Park District 4.5    
Sunshine 4.5 No Neighborhood/Community
Total 202.3    

Most of the existing parks provide both active and passive recreational facilities.  Passive recreational amenities include walking paths, natural areas, fishing, picnic tables and grill. Active recreational facilities include basketball and tennis courts, ice skating area, soccer and football fields, and a swimming pool. 

Parks can be categorized as either neighborhood parks or community parks.  Neighborhood parks are typically provided for intense recreational activities and serve a population residing within ¼ to ½ mile of the park site.  Desired size of a neighborhood park ranges between five and fifteen acres, with the ability to service a neighborhood of up to 5,000 people. Community parks typically provide a combination of active recreational facilities and passive outdoor recreation, depending on the site characteristics and community needs. They usually include natural features like lakes or wetlands.  A community park serves a group of neighborhoods often defined by major traffic routes. Targeted service population ranges from a one to two mile radius to the entire community, depending on the size of the park. The minimum desired size for a community park is approximately 15 acres. 

Park and recreational facilities maintained by local park districts occupy approximately 202.3 acres and include 72.8 acres owned by the Burr Ridge Park District, 125 acres owned by the Pleasant Dale Park District, and 4.5 acres owned by the Tri-State Park District. However, only about 126 acres (62%) of this park land is actually located within the Burr Ridge municipal boundaries. The acreage located within the Village of Burr Ridge translates into a ratio of 13.5 acres of park per 1,000 residents, well above the National Park and Recreation Association standard of 10 acres of park land for every 1,000 persons. 

A major issue is the presence of I-55, which prevents the residents, especially children from safely getting to and from certain parks. Many of the activities such as day camp, sport activities including baseball, soccer, tennis and other recreational programs occur at Walker Park which is located on the eastern edge of the Village. This, in effect, limits access to most of the residents of Burr Ridge and results in a low use level of the park. Furthermore, according to park district officials, there is not enough revenue to try and spread services out to different parks. 

Both the Burr Ridge and Pleasant Dale Park Districts are attempting to improve access to park facilities by all residents, by maintaining neighborhood parks and more effective coordination. The Burr Ridge Park District Master Plan, 1998, establishes a local standard of eight acres of park land per 1,000 population, with five acres allocated to community parks and 3 acres allocated to neighborhood parks. One goal of the Burr Ridge Park District master plan is to provide a playground within walking distance (1/2 mile) of every child within the district.  It also lists additional facilities and recreational amenities to be provided for neighborhood and community parks.  In the future, both park districts would like to see some type of aquatic and community center that is in a central location to benefit residents of both districts. The Comprehensive Plan recommends that the development of parks and recreational facilities be consistent with the recommendations of the Burr Ridge Park District Master Plan. 

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8.5    Library Services

The Village does not currently have a library, but services are provided to the Village residents through the Indian Prairie Library, the Hinsdale Library and by other area libraries on a fee basis. Several portions of Burr Ridge are within the Indian Prairie Library District boundaries. These areas are: 1) south of 91st Street and west of County Line Road; 2) west of Madison Street between 87th Street and Interstate Route I-55; and 3) most of the area bounded by County Line Road, Plainfield Road, Madison Street and I-55. All of the unincorporated portions of Burr Ridge’s planning area located between Madison Street and the Robert Kingery Highway (Route 83), south of Interstate Route I-55, are also located within the Indian Prairie Library District. 

The Plan recommends exploring the potential for providing Village library services to better serve Burr Ridge residents, as a part of a long range capital improvements program. Any new library facility should be centrally located in the Burr Ridge Corporate Park. 

8.6    Water & Sewer Service

The Burr Ridge Water Department provides Lake Michigan water to most Burr Ridge residents through a pumping, storage and distribution system. Three different sanitary districts provide sewer services. The Metropolitan Water Reclamation District is responsible for sewer services east of County Line Road. Within DuPage County, the northern portion of Burr Ridge is served by the Hinsdale Sanitary District, and the southern portion of the community is served by the DuPage County sanitary system. The majority of the soils in the planning area are extremely poor and will not support septic facilities. Therefore, new developments must have sewer connections. Additionally, residents should be encouraged to convert from individual wells and septic systems to Village water and sanitary sewer systems. 

Several subdivisions include privately owned and maintained detention ponds. Routine maintenance of these detention ponds should be encouraged to insure adequate storm water detention capacity in order to minimize flooding. 

Streets, or street sections, requiring curbs and gutters should be identified and improved. The curb and gutter improvements should be coordinated with the streetscape and pathway plans as recommended in the Community Design chapter and the Transportation and Circulation chapter. The curb and gutters could be constructed incrementally as properties adjoining the streets get developed or annexed. The Village could also consider establishing the curb and gutters at the same time, especially along sections of the same street, and recovering the costs at the time of annexation or development of adjoining parcels. This might result in a better coordinated and cleaner implementation of the curb and gutters.

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9. IMPLEMENTATION

This Comprehensive Plan is a guide that can help the Burr Ridge fulfill its vision. Implementation of its recommendations will require the use of a variety of approaches that can generally be grouped under three categories: organizational resources, legislative tools and financial techniques. 

9.1    Organizational Resources

Because no plan implements itself, the most important organizational resource is people. Someone must take action in response to a plan’s recommendations. Even widely endorsed ideas must be given the commitment and resources to bring them forth into reality. 

Recommendations without active support groups are seldom enacted. In Burr Ridge, several groups will need to continue to be involved in furthering the Comprehensive Plan’s recommendations, including the Plan Commission & Zoning Board of Appeals, Economic Development Committee and the Pathway Commission. Other groups may emerge as specific issues become important. 

However, the Village Board is probably the most critical group in ensuring that Burr Ridge continues to grow and prosper in accordance with the spirit of the Comprehensive Plan. The Village Board passes the ordinances which enable recommendations to go forward and approves their financing and support. Ultimately, any of the Plan’s recommendations must come before this body and be supported before any serious action can be taken. Village Trustees must not only subscribe to the values behind the recommendation but also to the merits and timeliness of its details. 

9.2    Legislative Tools

The power to authorize the ordinances that translate the Comprehensive Plan’s land use policies into reality is vested with the Village Board. Chief among these is the Zoning Ordinance that regulates the use of all land within the Village’s municipal boundaries. Examples of other ordinances that can help to improve community appearance and further the Plan’s recommendations include the Subdivision Ordinance, property maintenance codes, tree preservation ordinances and sign regulations. Such regulatory powers are an important means of shaping planning and development recommendations.  

The Village Board can help to further economic development policies through the use of tax increment financing, where appropriate, or support of available industrial tax incentives when necessary to attract an industrial user to the Cook County portion of Burr Ridge. Tools such as conservation easements designed to protect the community’s natural environment or sales tax rebates for retail uses, particularly in County Line Square, may also require legislative action by the Village Board.

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9.3    Financing Techniques

Carrying out Comprehensive Plan recommendations involves more than controlling and guiding

the private development that takes place in the community. Translating plans into action often means spending public dollars. Not surprisingly, desired physical improvements often exceed available financial resources. 

The Village’s annual budget is the primary example of how funds for specific community improvement projects are allocated. Sales and utility taxes are the primary revenue source for the Village. However, other funds that can be used for a variety of purposes include the Village’s share of sales and hotel/motel tax revenues, motor fuel tax funds, development fees and periodic state and federal grants. 

One of the best ways to achieve incremental progress toward physical improvements is through a long-range capital improvement program. Such a device allows projects to be spread out over a period of years in accordance with community priorities and anticipated funding. Capital improvement plans allow scarce resources to be allocated and interrelated projects coordinated to maximize the community’s investments in its future. 

Burr Ridge has historically been able to make considerable progress in achieving its physical improvement objectives through developer-financed improvements and development fees. However, at some point the pace of development will slow, and the Village will have to develop other means to finance desired improvements. A capital improvement program will be a key tool to guide these decisions. 

9.4    Anticipating Future Development Trends

As a relatively young still growing community, most of the infrastructure including streets, sewers and water lines is not yet in need of major maintenance or replacement. Similarly, most of the existing development is in good physical condition. However, at some point in the not too distant future, Burr Ridge will make the transition from a developing collection of subdivisions to a mature suburb. When this transition takes place Village officials will need to begin to take a new look at how community development issues are addressed. 

Burr Ridge has already begun to experience the “tear down” phenomenon, with small older homes on large lots being replaced with larger homes. In many cases, such large lots, originally developed under county zoning, are being subdivided to reflect current zoning. Moreover, the Village should anticipate future private interest in redeveloping some of the older commercial property in the community. The Zoning Ordinance should be revised to assure that redevelopment results in new buildings that reflect the community’s values. 

Rather than deciding appearance and site issues for new development, the Village will increasingly be faced with the challenge of ensuring that redevelopment enhances the image of Burr Ridge as a prestigious community. Rather than determining where new roadways should go, the Village will have to address which roadways will be resurfaced or rebuilt. There are many challenges that lie ahead. This Comprehensive Plan provides a useful tool for meeting these challenges.

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ORDINANCE NO.  A-869-01-03

AMENDMENT TO THE VILLAGE OF BURR RIDGE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN

 ADOPTED MARCH 10, 2003

5.2.1    AMENDMENT TO THE GERMAN CHURCH ROAD SUB-AREA


Subsequent to the adoption of the Village of Burr Ridge Comprehensive Plan on April 12, 1999, several actions have occurred in the German Church Road Sub-Area that have caused the Burr Ridge Plan Commission to reconsider the plan for the particular area at the southeast corner of German Church Road and County Line Road.  The area being reconsidered consists of 59 acres located south of German Church Road and east of County Line Road.  It is bounded by the Arrowhead Farm Subdivision to the east and the Highland Fields Subdivision to the south.

Subsequent to adoption of the Comprehensive Plan, the Highland Fields Subdivision has been annexed and developed and other annexations have caused this area to be completely surrounded by the Burr Ridge corporate limits.  As a result, the Village Board of Trustees has initiated actions to unilaterally annex this area.   Additionally, there was an estate-type home built within the 59-acre area on a five- acre parcel, and the Village has received inquiries from individual property owners including another estate-style home and a proposed subdivision with one-acre lots.  The discrepancy between these various development proposals, i.e. subdivision development versus estate homes, has spurred the Plan Commission to reconsider the plan for this area and establish a more detailed plan that will provide specific direction to property owners and developers interested in future land use and development of this particular area.

Existing Conditions
The most significant conditions that impact the future development of this 59-acre area are the existence of substantial woodlands, ravines, and wildlife in its northern 40 acres (eight parcels). These environmental conditions have been the primary inspiration for the estate-style homes that have existed in the area and for the new estate homes recently built or proposed.  Field surveys and aerial photographs have confirmed the environmental conditions prevalent within the northern 40 acres of this area and statements from property owners within the area have confirmed the desirability of preserving this environment.

The southern 19 acres (four parcels) have a substantially different topography and environment than the northern 40 acres.  These four parcels are relatively flat, and existing trees are limited to the periphery of the parcels.  The flat, open areas on these parcels have been maintained by homeowners as yard areas.  There are three homes on the property all of which are quality homes but may be undervalued compared to the underlying land values.

Public Utilities and Infrastructure
The entire 59- acre area is currently not serviced by public water or sanitary sewer.  Upon annexation into the Village of Burr Ridge, all of the properties should be able to access the Village’s public water supply system.  There are currently water mains on German Church Road and County Line Road.  These water mains are subject to recapture fees, but there do not appear to be any physical limitations to providing water service to this area.

Public sanitary sewer service is inherently more difficult to provide than public water.  Although there are sanitary sewer service lines on County Line Road at Deer Path Trail and at Hidden Lake Drive, those services are provided by the DuPage County Public Works Department, and the subject area is within the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District.  Recent correspondence from both agencies has indicated that it may be possible to connect the County Line Road parcels to the DuPage County

sanitary sewer.  The east half of the subject 59 acres may be serviced by a sanitary sewer stub located at the west edge of the adjacent Arrowhead Farm Subdivision.  Alternately, the Village of Burr Ridge Zoning Ordinance permits requests for private sanitary sewer systems for properties equal to or exceeding one acre and 150 feet wide subject to Village Board approval upon showing that access to a public sewer is not practical and a commitment is provided to connect to public sewer within six months after it becomes available.

In summary, it appears that public utilities may be accessible for this area.  Private sanitary sewer systems may be an option if public sewers are not available and lots remain at or above one acre and 150 feet in width.

Surrounding Zoning and Development
Surrounding zoning of the 59-acre area is entirely single-family residential but varies from the R-1 District with a minimum lot size of five acres to the R-3 District with a minimum lot size of approximately ½ acre.   Other than German Church Road and County Line Road, there are no street connections between the 59 acres and the surrounding subdivisions.  The surrounding residential zoning clearly dictates that the 59 acres remain single-family residential.  However, the variety of zoning in the surrounding area, the lack of direct connections between the 59 acres and the surrounding subdivisions, and the size of the area permits consideration of any of the various Burr Ridge zoning districts.  In other words, the 59-acre area which is the subject of this Plan amendment is relatively self contained.  As long as it is developed with single-family homes consistent in quality with other Burr Ridge homes, development of this area will not have an adverse impact on existing subdivisions or homes in the immediate area.

Recommendations for Future Zoning and Development
As noted above, the most significant condition of this area relative to future land use and development are the existing environmental conditions on the northern 40 acres (eight parcels).  This area contains significant woodlands, topography, and wildlife.  Preservation of such environmental conditions has already been established as a goal of the Village via the 1999 Comprehensive Plan (see Section 4.3).  The primary goal of this amendment to the Comprehensive Plan is to provide a mechanism for preserving the existing environmental conditions within the north 40 acres of this 59-acre area.  Therefore, the following conclusions and recommendations are provided:

  • The R-2 Single-Family Residence District should be utilized for the north 40 acres (eight parcels) of the subject area.  The R-2 District permits low density development of approximately two units per five acres.  The low density of the R-2 District reduces the environmental impacts from the construction of homes, accessory structures, utilities, and stormwater management facilities -- all of which contributes to the Plan’s desire to preserve existing environmental conditions.
  • The subject R-2 District should be accessed via rural cross-section streets consistent with the regulations of the Village of Burr Ridge Subdivision Ordinance.  Rural cross-section streets are more narrow than traditional suburban streets and do not include curbs, gutters, or underground storm sewers.  Thus, the R-2 District with its allowance of rural cross-section streets substantially contributes to the goal of preserving the existing environmental conditions.  The recommended rural streets may be private if deemed appropriate by the Village.
  • The Village should consider measures that would allow the existing properties, all of which are 4.5 to 5 acres in area, to be divided into two parcels.  This action would be intended to dissipate some of the development pressure currently placed on this area by the real estate market while still allowing property owners to obtain an increased value for their properties.  Measures to allow the split of these properties may include allowance of private street easements in lieu of dedicated right-of-way or relief from the R-2 District lot size requirements.
  • Street access to the R-2 District should be limited to the existing private streets that service the east half of the proposed R-2 District.  If any of the properties are split into two parcels, the existing private streets servicing those parcels should be improved to provide adequate access for emergency and service vehicles.
  • The south 19 acres (four parcels) may be considered for future subdivision development most preferably under the R-2A District standards.  The preferred development of this area would be a consolidation of the four parcels into one development tract.
  • Access to the southern parcels should be via a fully improved and dedicated suburban cross- section street with curbs, gutters, and storm sewers as required by the Burr Ridge Subdivision Ordinance.   Access from County Line Road should be limited to a single street located in compliance with the Subdivision Ordinance.

Implementation
The entire 59-acre area is expected to be annexed by the Village in the near future at which time it will automatically be placed within the Village’s R-1 Single-family Residence District as per Illinois State Statutes.  The Village may choose to initiate a rezoning of the entire area consistent with the recommendations of this Plan amendment or may choose to allow the property to remain within the R-1 District until such time that individual property owners approach the Village with the desire to rezone or subdivide their property.  Consideration of relief to allow properties within the recommended R-2 District to split their properties may also be considered as a whole or as individual properties approach the Village for rezoning or lot division.

 

 

 

Ordinance No. A-869-01-05

AMENDMENT TO THE VILLAGE OF BURR RIDGE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN

RECOMMENDED BY THE BURR RIDGE PLAN COMMISSION ON FEBRUARY 22, 2005 AND ADOPTED BY THE BURR RIDGE BOARD OF TRUSTEES ON

APRIL 11, 2005

The Burr Ridge Park Subarea

The Burr Ridge Corporate Park occupies one of the most prominent locations in Burr Ridge as evidenced by its location halfway between the north and south boundaries of the Village and at the primary entryway to the Village – the intersection of Interstate 55 and County Line Road.  Its location makes it the most accessible location in the Village for residents, businesses, and visitors.  Its location and development opportunities also make it the best location for the development of a Village Center or what may be more commonly described as “Downtown Burr Ridge.”  Finally, its location is such that potential negative impacts on existing residential districts will be minimal or non-existent. 

The Village Center is a unique district separate and distinct from the Village’s residential and business districts and which may be described as:

A mixed use district that serves as the primary place of economic and social interaction within the community; where people shop, live, socialize, and work, and which is easily identified as unique within the community.  The wide array of land uses and activities in the Village Center contributes to the creation of a unique place characterized by diverse and high quality physical, social, and economic interactions.

In pursuit of this vision for the Village Center, this sub-area plan includes the following policies and policy goals for the Burr Ridge Park Sub-Area:

  • Preferred land uses within the Burr Ridge Park are designated by the attached land use map entitled Figure 5:  Land Use Plan – Burr Ridge Park Sub Area and as further described by the policies herein.
  • The development of a Village Center should include and be limited to the four blocks designated in Figure 5 as the Village Center and listed on the attached Table 5.1.  In regards to each of these four blocks, the following policy statements are provided:
    • LifeTime Fitness/Opus Block: A town center development including 20 of the block’s 30 acres is pending before the Village concurrent with this Comprehensive Plan Amendment.  The proposed town center project will create the “Main Street” for the Village Center.  Further sub-area planning will need to address how the LifeTime Fitness portion of the block may complement the physical character of the Village Center.
    • TCF Bank Block: It is recognized that the owner of this 9 acre property has the right under existing zoning to construct additional office space.  It is anticipated that the creation of a Village Center will enhance the value of this property and create additional development opportunities for this property.  This property may also be key to maintaining the viability of the Village Center over time as new retail formats seek to locate in the Village Center.  The continued sub-area planning recommended herein should further address appropriate land uses and the physical character of this block.
    • County Line Square/Pace Block: The 1999 Burr Ridge Comprehensive Plan recommended the conversion of County Line Square into a pedestrian oriented town center.  This amendment endorses that concept and suggests that such re-development would be complementary to the proposed Village Center.
    • Harris Bank Block: This block consists of only two buildings and it is unlikely to see any dramatic changes in land use or physical character.  The importance of the block relative to the Village Center lies in its location at the gateway to the Village Center.  The continued sub-area planning should focus on the physical characteristics of this block relative to its gateway features and the need for physical connections to the remainder of the Village Center.
  • The Village Center should be a retail environment with shops, restaurants, entertainment, and businesses that provide commercial services for Burr Ridge residents, businesses, and visitors but may also include a variety of uses including offices, multiple-family residences in mixed use buildings or in mixed use environments, and if possible, civic or governmental uses.
  • Residential uses are to be in mixed use environments and complementary to the commercial environment of the Village Center rather than representing the primary land use character of the Village Center.
  • Architecture, streets, landscaping, building configuration, and the general physical environment of the Village Center should primarily be oriented toward the comfort and safety of pedestrians while ensuring ease of circulation and parking for motorists.
  • Multi-story buildings are preferred within the Village Center for their contributions to the creation of enclosed spaces and for opportunities for a mixture of activities.
  • While the primary means of access to the Village Center should remain from County Line Road, an improved means of vehicular access to the Village Center should be provided from Wolf Road in a manner that reduces the impact on the adjacent residential areas.
  • Development within the Village Center at the south end of the TCF Block and the east end of the County Line Square/Pace Block should be designed to minimize negative impacts and to complement the adjacent Chasemoor townhomes. 
  • The development of the areas within the Burr Ridge Park but outside the four-block Village Center should remain used or planned for office development.  Additional small office buildings that are three stories in height, as permitted under the existing O-2 District zoning, are the preferred use for these properties.
  • Pedestrian connections within the Village Center and between the Village Center and surrounding areas should be strengthened and further enhanced.

This amendment to the Village of Burr Ridge Comprehensive Plan is intended to establish general goals and polices for the creation of a Village Center.  Upon adoption of this amendment, a detailed sub-area plan should be developed by the Village that further considers means for implementation of these goals and policies and provides greater detail about the preferred mix of land uses, the enhancement of a pedestrian environment, and land use and appropriate development policies for the adjacent areas within and adjacent to the Burr Ridge Park.


Table 5.1 List of Blocks and Properties in the Village Center 

Address of Property

Owner; Occupant; or Name

Site Area

Zoning

PIN No.

Description

 

Burr Ridge Village Center: LifeTime/Opus Block

501-1201 Burr Ridge Parkway

Opus North on behalf of Avgeris and Associates

21 Acres

O-2 Office and Hotel

18-30-300-028

Vacant Land – Town Center Proposed

601 Burr Ridge Parkway

LifeTime Fitness

10 Acres

O-2 Office and Hotel

18-30-300-029

108,000 square foot Private Health and Fitness Club

 

Burr Ridge Village Center: TCF Block

700 McClintock Drive

TCF Bank

5 Acres

L-I; Light Industrial

12-30-302-001
12-30-302-002

6-story 75,000 sq. ft. office building

800 McClintock Drive

TCF Bank

4 Acres

L-I; Light Industrial

18-30-302-004 18-30-302-026

Vacant

 

Burr Ridge Village Center: County Line Square Block

20-324 Burr Ridge Parkway

County Line Square Shopping Center

7.2 Acres

B-1 Retail Business

12-30-305-003
12-30-301-001

100,931 square foot strip retail center

50 Burr Ridge Parkway

County Line Square Outlot

0.5 Acres

B-1 Retail Business

12-30-305-003

3,100 square foot office building

350 Burr Ridge Parkway

County Line Square Outlot

2.5 Acres

B-1 Retail Business

18-30-305-004

Vacant

7650 Lincolnshire Dr.

Pace Park and Ride

4.4 Acres

B-1 Retail Business

12-30-301-002

165 space Park and Ride Lot

 

Burr Ridge Village Center: Harris Bank Block

101 Burr Ridge Parkway

Harris Bank and Offices

1.8 Acres

B-2 General Business

12-30-304-004

3-story; 26,000 square feet – retail bank and offices

201 Bridewell Drive

Max’n Erma’s

1.8 Acres

B-2 General Business

12-30-304-003

7,312 square foot restaurant

 

 

APPENDIX

Community Perspective

While the existing land use pattern, environmental constraints and location of community facilities largely establish the physical character of the community, it is the opinions and desires of community residents that determines the direction of Village government and the overall community image. To understand the views of community residents, two early steps were undertaken. First a series of key person interviews and focus group discussions were held to identify issues and concerns of a variety of community residents, business leaders and public officials. The second part of the public participation process was a community survey, sent to all community residents through the Village’s newsletter. The results of these community outreach efforts are described below. 

Key Person Interviews And Focus Groups

Key person interviews and focus group discussions designed to identify issues facing the community were early steps in the comprehensive planning process. A wide variety of individuals and groups were interviewed including Village officials, representatives of other tax districts, long-time community residents, developers, realtors, and others familiar with Burr Ridge. The insights gained from these sessions provided background information on the community services and facilities provided by other local taxing districts and helped to guide the development of the community survey which was the primary means of community involvement in the first phase of the comprehensive planning process. 

Over the last several decades, Burr Ridge has made a transition from a rural community to a bedroom community that has easy access to Chicago. The discussions with the focus groups and key people were directed toward identifying where there was consensus concerning community direction and where there were divergent opinions over future growth and development in Burr Ridge. 

Why Burr Ridge?

In response to questions about why residents and businesses chose to locate in Burr Ridge, several common themes emerged. Burr Ridge provides a sense of privacy which is of primary importance to most residents and also a few businesses that want to maintain a low profile. Burr Ridge offers easy access to Chicago, a locational asset that is a major consideration for many of the businesses located in Burr Ridge, as well as residents. Burr Ridge is viewed as a prestigious address. 

New Burr Ridge residents include corporate transferees and families moving up to a more affluent lifestyle. Residents, in general, are highly individualistic in Burr Ridge, community links between residents are most likely created through activities within each subdivision or activities involving children. 

Discussions with individuals involved in various aspects of the real estate community indicates that Burr Ridge is a buyer’s market. There are a number of undeveloped lots in residential subdivisions. Price is an issue; not many families can afford Burr Ridge but those that can have a number of other options.  

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Community Character

The features that best define the character of Burr Ridge include the village’s low density residential neighborhoods, open space, the wooded areas, and the topography. The sense that Burr Ridge possesses a “country” atmosphere appears to be derived from the large lot sizes, mature trees that line many of the village’s roads, and the lack of curbs gutters and sidewalks along the main streets. 

There is a general feeling that Burr Ridge’s rural character won’t be compromised as long as decision makers continue to resist increased residential density. While the preservation of the community’s “rural character” is important, there also appears to be a general consensus that new subdivisions should include improved streets with curbs and gutters. Several people expressed the sentiment that it is time for Burr Ridge to make a transition from a growing suburb to a mature suburb that can focus on building a sense of community. 

The poor appearance of the Frontage Roads that line the Interstate Route I-55 corridor was cited by several people as an issue that needs to be addressed. Appearance issues are of particular concern to image conscious business tenants who have chosen to locate in Burr Ridge because it is a prestigious address. 

Planning and Development Issues

The major planning issues facing Burr Ridge revolve around the question about what kind of community Burr Ridge should be as it moves further from its origins as a collection of rural county subdivisions, toward a fully developed suburban community. While many residents have chosen Burr Ridge for the sense of privacy that it offers, others lament the lack of a town center or other community focal point. At least on the part of some residents, a sense of community is missing. Whatever is done, there seems to be at least some consensus, that change and limited commercial development is acceptable as long as it doesn’t bring in too much traffic from outside of the community. 

The future of the Burr Ridge Corporate Park is probably the most serious economic issue facing Burr Ridge. While commercial and industrial land on the DuPage County side of the community is almost completely developed, considerable commercial property remains on the Cook County portion of Burr Ridge. The I-55 corridor is not perceived as an office corridor but is a prime location for distribution uses. However, office is the preferred land use for most of the remaining land in the Corporate Park, at least in part, because office uses tend to attract a controlled transient population that is not in Burr Ridge in the evenings or on weekends. 

There was little consensus on the issue of pathways. Some people believe that sidewalks were out of character with the rural look of Burr Ridge. Other residents favored the installation of sidewalks and asphalt paths for safety reasons and to create a sense of community. The current practice of installing pathways on one side of the street in new subdivisions and along major streets has been established as the preferred alternative. 

One of the impediments to establishing a clear community identity is the lack of a clear set of municipal boundaries. Especially along the major community arterials, the corporate boundaries are irregular and contribute to the uncoordinated appearance of many of these road segments. Several people stated that clear, consistent and recognizable municipal boundaries were needed. These individuals supported a proactive annexation policy as a means to this end. 

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Community Survey

In order to provide all Burr Ridge residents with an opportunity to provide input into the comprehensive planning process, a community survey was sent to all Burr Ridge residents in July, 1998. Responses were received from 630 of 3,236 (approximately 20%) households by the July 27, 1998 deadline. Approximately 33 additional responses were received after the deadline which could not be included in the tabulation of survey results discussed below. 

Community Image

Burr Ridge was characterized as a “low density suburban community.” The majority of the residents chose to live in Burr Ridge due to its physical character and proximity to Chicago and work. Most respondents were not in favor of a” town center” and preferred 20,000 square feet as the ideal lot size. The survey results are discussed below. Please note that each underlined text denotes a question on the survey. 

Main Reasons for Choosing to Live in Burr Ridge:  Physical characteristics of Burr Ridge and the proximity to Chicago and work were the predominant factors influencing this decision, receiving more than 50% of the total response. 

Desirable Lot Size:  20,000 sq.ft. was the preferred lot size for 41% of the respondents. 20,000 sq.ft. lots were picked out by approximately half the respondents who had lived in Burr Ridge for more than 20 years.  The newest residents (less than 2 years in Burr Ridge) rated 30,000 sq.ft. lots higher than other groups.  Residents who had lived in the Village between 2 to 20 years chose 15,000 sq.ft. lots as their second preference. 

Need for a Town Center: A majority (66%) of the respondents stated that the Village did not need a town center. Residents who had lived in the village for over 20 years were the only group slightly in favor of a town center. The survey showed that the more the children in a household the less the desire for a town center. 

Physical Character of Burr Ridge:  The majority of the respondents (60.5%) described Burr Ridge as a “low density suburban community.” The second most common (42.5%) characterization was as a “collection of subdivisions.” 

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Quality of Services and Amenities

The visual character of Burr Ridge as well as the quality of most of the services and amenities were ranked as either excellent or adequate by majority of the respondents.  Access to shopping, restaurants and entertainment were the only amenities that were clearly inadequate and needed improvement  Other areas that while adequate, could be improved, were parks and recreation programs, sewer and storm water maintenance, curb and gutter, and finally street and sidewalk maintenance.  The results of the survey are as follows: 

Visual Character:  The visual character of Burr Ridge was described as excellent by a majority (42.4%) of the respondents.  Over half of these respondents had lived in Burr Ridge for less than 5 years. Approximately 39% of the respondents, mostly those who had lived in the Village for over 10 years, said that the visual character was adequate. 

Appearance of County Line Road:  County Line Road’s appearance was considered adequate by more than half (53%) of the respondents. 

Schools:  The schools were ranked as either excellent or adequate by the majority (64%) of residents.  However, only approximately half of these respondents had children.  A quarter of the total respondents had no opinion about the school system, primarily because they had no children. 

Police Protection, Fire Protection, Paramedic Services: The majority of the respondents considered these services as either excellent or adequate. However, approximately 15% of the residents had no opinion about fire protection, and 36% of the residents had no opinion on paramedic services. 

Sanitary Sewer and Water, Storm Water Maintenance, Street Maintenance, Sidewalks, Curb and Gutters:  These were considered adequate, but not excellent, by the majority of the respondents.  A significant number of respondents felt that these services could be improved. Approximately 18% of the residents had no opinion regarding sidewalks or curb and gutters.

Open Space: The quality of open space was considered adequate by approximately 60% and excellent by 21% of the respondents.  

Parks, Recreation Programs:  The predominant opinion was that parks and recreation programs were adequate, but could be improved.  Approximately 13% of the respondents had no opinion about parks, and 38% had no opinion about recreation programs.  Most of these respondents did not have any children. 

Day Care: The majority of the residents (74%) did not think that day care was an issue. It should be noted that of these residents, approximately 67% had no children. 

Access to Shopping, Restaurants and Entertainment:  The residents predominantly felt that the access to shopping, entertainment and restaurants was inadequate or needed improvement. It should be noted that a significant number of respondents felt that these facilities were adequate. 

Medical Services, Professional Services, Social Services, Public Transportation:  The majority of the respondents had no opinion on these items.

Resident Opinion

Residents were asked to express their opinions on a variety of issues which are likely to be addressed in the Comprehensive Plan. These issues can generally be grouped under the categories of community character, growth policies, office/commercial development, residential development and capital improvement policies. Highlights from the survey results are described below. 

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i) Community Character

Most residents felt strongly that Burr Ridge had a unique character that should be protected.  They also felt that the County Line Road character should be preserved, and design guidelines should be established for new developments along major entryway corridors.  There was not much consensus on whether Burr Ridge needed a central focal point, or had a strong community identity. 

Protecting Community Character:  87% of the residents agree or strongly agree that the community character should be protected.

Community Character:  The majority of the residents felt that Burr Ridge was an unique community.  Most agreed that it could be characterized as a mix of country and city.

Community Identity:  There was not much consensus on whether Burr Ridge had a strong sense of community identity.

Central Focal Point:  Approximately 40% of the respondents felt that Burr Ridge needed a central focal point.  However, the same number of residents had no opinion on this issue.

Design Guidelines:  Most residents agreed or strongly agreed that design guidelines should be established for new development along major entryway corridors.

County Line Road Character: Most residents (70%) felt that preservation of the County Line Road character was an important issue. 

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ii) Growth

There seemed to be the least amount of consensus on this issue.  A majority of the residents did not think that Burr Ridge was developing too rapidly.  However, half the respondents felt that the Village should play an active role in adopting policies to limit future residential growth. At the same time, further annexation of land south of German Church Road was considered desirable. 

Growth:  Majority of the respondents did not feel as though Burr Ridge was developing too rapidly. While half the respondents felt that Burr Ridge should adopt policies to limit future residential growth, another half either disagreed or were neutral on this issue.  When this question was reframed (Q.44), most residents felt that the Village should play an active role in controlling the amount of growth in Burr Ridge.

Annexation:  Most residents (40%) agreed or strongly agreed that the Village should annex land south of German-Church Road and east of County Line Road. 

iii) Office/Commercial Development

There was no clear consensus on whether financial incentives should be provided to encourage development of additional offices and light industry.  However, most residents felt that existing commercial development was inadequate and its development should be encouraged. 

Corporate Park Development:  More residents appeared to be in favor of, rather than against, providing economic incentives to encourage development in the Corporate Park located across from Village Hall.  However, there does not appear to be a strong consensus on this issue.

Financial Incentives: While more residents supported providing financial incentives to attract additional offices and light industry, there was no strong consensus on this issue. 

Adequacy of Commercial Development: Most of the residents felt that the amount of commercial development within Burr Ridge did not meet their day to day needs.

Commercial Development: Similarly the majority of the responded felt that Burr Ridge should encourage more commercial development. 

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iv)  Residential Development

Preserving and protecting open space did not emerge as a major concern.  Most respondents were also against providing more entry level housing and a diverse range of lot sizes. 

Residential Development: Most of the respondents were against clustering residential development in order to preserve significant open space.

Most residents were against encouraging a diverse range of lot sizes.

Entry Level Housing:  66% of the residents disagreed or strongly disagreed that more entry level housing for young families should be provided.

House Sales:  There was no consensus on the ease of selling a house in Burr Ridge.

Open Space:  There was no clear consensus as to whether the residents are willing to pay more taxes to preserve and protect open space. 

v) Capital Improvements

Most residents thought that curb and gutters were appropriate for residential development.

Curb and Gutter:  A majority (62.5%) of the residents agreed or strongly agreed that curb and gutters should be made part of any improvement and development program.  However, there was no strong consensus as to whether some subdivisions should be allowed streets without curb and gutter.

Sidewalks:  There was no strong consensus on whether asphalt sidewalks instead of cement sidewalks were acceptable to the community.

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